metakinesis

met·a·ki·ne·sis

, metakinesia (met'ă-ki-nē'sis, -ki-nē'sē-ă),
Moving apart; the separation of the two chromatids of each chromosome and their movement to opposite poles in the anaphase of mitosis.
[meta- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

metakinesis

The process in which the chromatids of a chromosome are separated and migrate toward the spindle poles during mitosis; anaphase.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

met·a·ki·ne·sis

, metakinesia (met'ă-ki-nē'sis, -sē-ă)
Moving apart; the separation of the two chromatids of each chromosome and their movement to opposite poles in the anaphase of mitosis.
[meta- + G. kinēsis, movement]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

metakinesis

(mĕt″ă-kĭ-nē′sĭs)
Moving apart, esp. the moving of the two chromatids of each chromosome away from each other as they move to opposite poles in the anaphase of mitosis.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the process of what she calls "metakinesis," one learns to sense and respond to "bodily and emotional states" as if they indicated the real presence of God.
Metakinesis: How God becomes intimate in contemporary U.S.
Finally, John Martin's term metakinesis, the transference of energy between the dancer and spectator, connects dance to Kristeva's chora.
From there, we need to connect the chora of the dancer through geno-dance to the spectator; metakinesis offers this possibility.
The geno-dance reaches the spectator through metakinesis. The dancer communicates with the spectator on both the physical and the psychic level.
"Metakinesis." In Roger Copeland and Marshall Cohen, eds., What is Dance: 23-24.