metaculture

metaculture

An abstract set of universal concepts—e.g., humour, social rank/hierarchy—which are said to exist in all human cultures.
References in periodicals archive ?
Memes and Metaculture: the Politics of Discourse Circulation in Fiji.
Greg Urban's theory of metaculture, which has served as inspiration for the notion of 'metacultural terms' proposed here, defines metaculture as the reflexive process of culture commenting on itself, or "culture that is about culture." (7) For example, a book review is a concrete manifestation of metaculture since it is a cultural entity which comments on or evaluates another cultural product (i.e., the book under review).
(7.) By "metaculture" we refer to cultural practices, techniques, and forms that reflect on and help structure other aspects of culture.
Landfall was part of the modern discursive formation Francis Mulhern labels 'metaculture', a writing which 'speaks of its own generality and historical conditions of existence' in order to 'mobilize "culture" as a principle against the prevailing generality of "politics" in the disputed plane of social authority.' (11) We have critical histories attuned to the gendered and racialized assumptions in this move already, but what the Journals bring properly into view is the complex set of class assumptions determining Brasch's project.
Religious discourse as metaculture. European Journal of Cultural Studies 5(1): 25^17.
Eight chapters are: metaculture and its malcontents; Buddhist circuits and the oworldingo practices in North India; seductions and disenchantments in the making of an ecomuseum; imprisoning ethnic heritage in French Guiana; indigenous crafts, political re-enchantment and the rational of heritage making in Costa Rica; Mexico for sale; feeding disenchantment; tourism values and the becoming ordinary of heritage.
(15.) Greg Urban, Metaculture: How Culture Moves through the World (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 200l).
Urban (2001) suggests that this phenomenon of reproducing the imagined community using the first-person plural can be seen as "metaculture." He suggests that the "we" in a nationalist text assimilates the agency of the proposed and possible participants to the conversation.
represent a blank metaculture that appropriates various
interculturalism adds what might be called a metaculture created co-operatively through the efforts of the co-existing groups ...
Latching is a hook--a song, a campaign slogan (DeNora 2000)--that can be circulated to the point that it "ricochets off other people's experiences and bounces across with them" (Dorsey 119), so that it creates velocity and produces a "cultural snowball effect" or "metaculture" (119-20).
To transcend one's self and one's social moment, one must connect to other cultural and historical moments that form a larger metaculture. Just as memory gives the self coherence over time, heredity links the individual to the transhistorical and, in that sense, transcendent identity of the culture.