mesophyte

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mesophyte

a plant growing in soil with a normal water content. Compare HYDROPHYTE, XEROPHYTE.
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The "Mixed Mesophytic," she called it, for it is the richest, most varied deciduous forest on the continent if not the whole world.
The site consists primarily of mesophytic forest community and is underlain by a dome of gravel substrate with slopes in all directions; some of the slopes are quite steep, especially on the north and east sides.
The gradual increase in the number of species in the rocks from the driest site to the most mesophytic one means that more different niches in the rocks become available for colonization by plants as moisture availability increases.
Braun (1950) described the vegetation of Kentucky as mixed mesophytic forest in the Cumberland Plateau and Cumberland Mountain regions to the east and as western mesophytic forest west of the Cumberland Plateau.
It seems reasonable to infer that, during the Holocene, as wetness was restored to the cerrado region, the lixiviation process became more intense (Furley, 1999), promoting the expansion of cerrados and the retraction of mesophytic forests which never regained the rich and extensive forest cover it had during the Pliocene (Raven and Axelrod, 1974), not even as precipitation increased (Oliveira Filho and Ratter, 2000).
Collins, to the lush mixed mesophytic cove forests near Sugarlands Visitor Center.
The habitat is distinctive as compared with the mesophytic forests inhabited by the most similar congener, Leptomicrurus scutiventris.
The major historical natural ecosystem is the Western Mesophytic Forest region (Braun, 1950), which is characterized by a mix of oak (Quercus) and hickory (Carya) tree species.
In the Rhine valley, logs are frequently colonized by shrubs and even trees (Rosa canina, Prunus padus)--which may emerge from rotting hearts of old, senescent trees, particularly in forests prone to long flooding (willow or alder forests)--because rotting trees are the only site on which mesophytic species can grow.
Since Diaz & Fernandez-Prieto (1994) described for the Lacian-Ancarensean territories a kind of mixed supratemperate, riparian forest (which they called Festuco giganteae-Fraxinetum excelsioris) with no trace of alder trees, the existence of mesophytic, riparian ash tree forests ascribable to Alno-Padion came to light.