mesmerism

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hypnotism

 [hip´no-tizm]
the study of or the method or practice of inducing hypnosis.

mes·mer·ism

(mes'mer-izm),
A system of therapeutics from which were developed hypnotism and therapeutic suggestion.
[F.A. Mesmer, Austrio-Hungarian physician, 1734-1815]

mesmerism

(mĕz′mə-rĭz′əm, mĕs′-)
n.
1. A strong or spellbinding appeal; fascination.
2. Hypnotic induction believed to involve animal magnetism.
3. Hypnotism.

mes·mer′ic (-mĕr′ĭk) adj.
mes·mer′i·cal·ly adv.
mes′mer·ist n.
A method of hypnosis that allegedly placed patients in a trance-like state deep enough to allow major surgery without pain, or awareness of the operation, named for Austrian physician Franz Anton Mesmer, who developed it

mes·mer·ism

(mes'mĕr-izm)
A system of therapeutics from which were developed hypnotism and therapeutic suggestion.

Mesmer,

Franz Anton, Austrian physician, 1733-1815.
mesmeric crisis - reaction technique. Synonym(s): grand crisis; magnetic crisis
mesmerism - the use of hypnotism as practiced by Mesmer.

mes·mer·ism

(mes'mĕr-izm)
A system of therapeutics from which hypnotism and therapeutic suggestion developed.

Patient discussion about mesmerism

Q. HYPNOSIS can hypnosis be used in bi-polar disorder?

A. there is no reason why not. people with bipolar disorder can be susceptible to hypnosis like any others. but like all population the ability to be hypnotized is variable. some are very suggestible and some are not. doesn't say anything on the person- very smart and intelligent people can be hypnotized.

Q. How effective is hypnosis in treating alcoholism? And how expensive is it? I've already tried hypnotherapy for social anxiety problems but the guy was a useless quack and I didn't even go under properly.

A. Hypnosis is a very effective treatment for addictions, it was used back in the 19th century as one but the use of hypnosis today is smaller then before. Here is a web page with some info about it:
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa4087/is_200407/ai_n9425378

More discussions about mesmerism
References in periodicals archive ?
Elliotson on his mesmeric subject, to control the "stops" of Aurora's poetic breath, stems from the assumption of his own gender's privilege.
(7) Of the quotations Aspiz included, the following first appear in the 1842 Whitman editorial: "[s]ome seasons ago," "a devout disbeliever in the science of Animal Magnetism," "there is such a thing as Mesmeric sleep," and "strange things done by the subject at the will of the Magnetizer."
He was mesmeric. If the England manager was here, that can only be good news for Ashley.
In taking mesmeric possession of her [Svengali] made her into the ultimate human instrument ...
In 'Mesmeric Revelations, Poe stated that "the starting facts of mesmerism are now almost universally admitted," but most modern readers ignore "these facts".
His design reads as delicately transparent planes set in a mature landscape, recalling other projects of the period such as the Cartier Foundation in the Montparnasse district of Paris, in which mass is dissolved in a mesmeric play of light, reflections and evanescence.
Through his and the Meroitic priests' mesmeric capabilities, he learns of what is transpiring at home, of Aubrey's plot.
We watch the whole action unfold in unmanipulated real time, yet this scene, like all the scenes of the janitor at work, has a certain mesmeric appeal.
69, my emphasis), and partly because she conflates different ideas of "harmony." While early French mesmerism might have borrowed promiscuously from both the "harmony of the spheres" and Enlightenment theory (though Weliver does not explore the tensions between these discourses as they existed in mesmeric theory), it is misleading to suggest that "associations between government, music and individual character call to mind the harmony of the spheres" in the context of a utilitarian driven Victorian England (p.
There are mesmeric images of tornadoes, kelvin helmholtz waves, glorys, green flashes and more.
This tradition of concepts of force associated with the human body has a history dating from antiquity and was particularly prominent in the mesmeric movement between the 18th and the 19th centuries.
In a series of more speculative but highly suggestive chapters, Winter connects mesmeric imagery and discourse to the figure of the female invalid, to religious discussions of inspiration and possession, to debates over the nature of science and scientific authority, and to the development of theories of social consensus and social will.