mesentery

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mesentery

 [mes´en-ter″e]
1. a membranous fold attaching an organ to the body wall.
2. the peritoneal fold attaching the small intestine to the dorsal body wall; called also mesenterium. adj., adj mesenter´ic.

mes·en·ter·y

(mes'en-ter'ē), [TA]
1. A double layer of peritoneum attached to the abdominal wall and enclosing in its fold a portion or all of one of the abdominal viscera, conveying to it its vessels and nerves.
2. The fan-shaped fold of peritoneum suspending the greater part of the small intestines (jejunum and ileum) and attaching it to the posterior abdominal wall at the root of the mesentery (radix mesenterii). Synonym(s): mesenterium dorsale commune, mesostenium
Synonym(s): mesenterium [TA]
[Mod. L. mesenterium, fr. G. mesenterion, fr. G. mesos, middle, + enteron, intestine]

mesentery

(mĕz′ən-tĕr′ē, mĕs′-)
n. pl. mesenter·ies
Any of several folds of the peritoneum that connect the intestines to the dorsal abdominal wall, especially such a fold that envelops the jejunum and ileum.

mes′en·ter′ic adj.

mesentery

The double layer of peritoneum which covers abdominal organs and suspends the small intestine south of the ligament of Treitz—i.e., the jejunum and the ileum.

Pronunciation
Medspeak-UK: pronounced, MEE sen terry
Medspeak-US: pronounced, MEH sen terry

Many in the UK pronounce this the same as in the US.

mes·en·ter·y

(mes'ĕn-ter-ē) [TA]
1. A double layer of peritoneum attached to the abdominal wall and enclosing in its fold a portion or all of one of the abdominal viscera, conveying to it its vessels and nerves.
2. The fan-shaped fold of peritoneum encircling the greater part of the small intestines (jejunum and ileum) and attaching it to the posterior abdominal wall at the root of the mesentery (radix mesenterii).
Synonym(s): mesenterium.
[Mod. L. mesenterium, fr. G. mesenterion, fr. G. mesos, middle, + enteron, intestine]

mesentery

The complex, double-layered folded curtain of PERITONEUM that encloses the bowels and by which they are suspended from the back wall of the abdomen. Blood and lymphatic vessels run to and from the intestines between the two layers of the mesentery.

mesentery

  1. the layers of PERITONEUM that attach the gut system and its associated organs (e.g. SPLEEN) to the dorsal surface of the peritoneal cavity in mammals. The blood, lymph and nerve supplies to the gut are contained in the mesentery.
  2. one of the filaments dividing the body cavity of sea anemones and corals.
References in periodicals archive ?
[44] in a group of 7 patients with intestinal tuberculosis sonographically, asymmetric thickening of small bowel wall (in 100% patients), intramural abscesses (86%), fistulas (43%), mesenteric thickening and white bowel sign (both 29%), enlarged mesenterial lymph nodes with inhomogenous echostructure and hypoechogenic spots (86%), and ascites (29%) were detected.
Id, e) highlight the turquoise-stained inner part of the mesenterial filament, indicating the presence of fibrous collagen, surrounded by the endodermal cells.
SEM images showed a convoluted mesenterial filament along the mesentery (Fig.
TEM micrography of a cross-sectioned mesenterial filament yielded several sections of its collagen fiber at a given plane (Fig.
However, our findings also revealed the unique microanatomical and ultrastructural characteristics of its mesenterial filaments, not previously documented for octocorals (Figs.
Little has changed in the perception of the structure of octocoral mesenterial filaments since the early work by Hyman (1940).
The mesenterial tissue was densely packed with zooxanthellae, and the tissues around the oocytes contained many zooxanthellae, but the oocytes themselves were never observed to contain zooxanthellae (Fig.
Similar digestive mechanisms exist in Anthozoa (4, 5), where the prey is wrapped by mesenterial filaments; moreover, the mesenteries of Anthozoa also have dense ciliation, which is involved in particle transport (1).
During extracellular digestion of the wrapped food, very little of the three dyes could be detected in the gastric cavity in all ten tested anemones, which indicated that particulate food fragments as well as soluble constituents (e.g., the water-soluble dye Evans blue) were almost completely trapped in the mesenterial sacs.