quinacrine

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Related to mepacrine: Atabrine

quinacrine

 [kwin´ah-krin]
an anthelmintic and antiprotozoal agent used especially for treatment of malaria, giardiasis, and tapeworm infestations. It is a yellow fluorescent dye also used in chromosome banding.

quinacrine

(kwĭn′ə-krēn′)
n.
A compound, C23H30ClN3O, administered in its hydrochloride form, that was formerly used as an antimalarial and antihelminthic drug and, in some countries, has been used as an agent for the nonsurgical sterilization of women.

quinacrine

Classic cytogenetics A fluorescent dye used to stain chromosomes, especially Y chromosome Gynecology Tropical medicine An antiparasitic agent once used to manage giardiasis, helminths, malaria, protozoa, tapeworms

quinacrine

A yellow acridine dye useful in studying chromosomal structure because of its property of fluorescing when bound to certain regions of chromosomes. Also known as mepacrine. Quinacrine was once widely used to prevent malaria and to remove tapeworms.
References in periodicals archive ?
She made the switch from 75 mg/day of mepacrine to 100 mg/day of Plaquenil.
Prior to the mepacrine, she did several rounds of anti-parasitics (Alinia, albendazole, mebendazole, ivermectin) with little change in histamine issues but improved health in other ways.
However, the breakthrough only occurred after adding the mepacrine into her overall regime.
Prior to mepacrine she had been on optimum doses of Alinia, fenbendazole, Biltricide, ivermectin, and a short course of Paramomycin.
Deliberate failure to take Mepacrine on a regular and consistent basis led to confidence-eroding "breakthrough infections" when the level of Mepacrine in the blood became too low to control the proliferation of the malaria parasite.
Compounding the failure of disease-prevention measures, members of the Chindit force gave up the suppressive benefits of Mepacrine. The medical officers, facing a situation that appeared insurmountable, gave up, allowing themselves to fall to the low standard set by the men.
Like the British, the Americans relied primarily upon Atabrine (Mepacrine) to suppress and control malaria.
A flow cytometric assay using mepacrine for study of uptake and release of platelet dense granule contents.