mentor

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mentor

 [men´tor] (pl. men·tor)
a person with more experience in a given area who takes responsibility for helping someone with less experience to develop needed knowledge and skills.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mentor

A professional and role model who advises and provides feedback for a junior colleague. Mentors may be a resource for career advancement, graduate clinical, research and publishing opportunities, funding, credential support, and obtaining tenure-track positions.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mentor

Graduate education  A professional and a role model who gives attention and feedback to a junior colleague
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Good proteges give back to their mentors. Don't be a parasite who only takes or receives favours with nothing to offer.
Shrum, who grew up in Coweta and attended Connors State College on a basketball scholarship, credits a college mentor for recognizing her gift for science and encouraging her to go to medical school.
(5.) Management Mentors. The difference between coaching and mentoring.
Just as important, administrators must define the mentor's role clearly from the start, making sure they understand precisely what they will and will not be expected to do: Will they serve strictly as mentors, or will they also be asked to assess new teachers' skills and progress?
That being said, research also shows that one in three young people will still reach adulthood without the benefit of having a mentor (Mentor, 2017).
The best way to circumvent conflicts is to have a mindful pairing process and help mentees and mentors establish deep trust and respect early and with purpose once they are matched.
In the Hindu epics mentors were seen to be playing a critical role in the lives of their mentees.
For this study, constructivism allowed the researchers to focus on the individual experiences of the participants and their role as mentors in a leadership development program.
In general, employers were interested in getting mentors for all levels of nursing staff (CNA, LPN, and RN).
Mentors have heavy responsibilities on their shoulders and are trained to empathize and listen but at times it becomes very difficult for the mentor to keep emotions away from their duty.
Forming and sustaining mentoring relationships presents challenges, including finding suitable and knowledgeable mentors to overcome cultural, ethnic, racial, gender, or organizational barriers.