mentoring


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mentoring

(1) A process whereby an experienced, highly regarded, empathic person (the mentor) guides another individual (the mentee) in the development and re-examination of his or her own ideas, learning, and personal and professional development. The mentor, who often (but not necessarily always) works in the same organisation or field as the mentee, achieves this by listening and talking in confidence to the mentee.
(2) A semi-structured process by which a more experienced senior doctor or other health professional assists a junior by offering advice, support and encouragement and acting as a role model.
(3) A generic term for the duties and activities carried out by a mentor.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As indicated in Table 3, a large percentage of mentees did not agree that promotion, career advancement opportunity, networking, recognition, visibility, job satisfaction and organizational commitment were some of the outcomes of the mentoring process.
Consequently, a study focused on the environmental, use, and outcome conditions associated with mentoring used as a learning tool within a leadership development program for individuals associated with agriculture within the land-grant university system may provide valuable educational and programmatic insights.
To learn how nurses used their mentoring skills, we surveyed workshop participants one year after the last live workshop.
Conclusion: Majority of students of Bahria University Medical and Dental College are able to carry on with their academic and non-academic routine due to the presence of mentoring. The medical students appreciated the presence of a mentor during thick and thin; they have also accepted that it is due to the presence of this guide that they are able to continue with their difficult studies in these difficult times.
Various theories have been advanced to explain the reasons for low participation in mentoring programs.
According to a recent study titled Mentoring for mental health which assessed the benefits of formal mentoring programmes in the English police force, "mentoring relationships provide a unique context for mentors to discuss and normalise their concerns, to share ideas for managing anxieties, and to find more meaning in their work." The study is as relevant to the personnel of the English police force as it is to a bank employee, a healthcare professional or one in any other line of business.
Bruce Cooper and Jan Hammond, in the preface, begin the volume by describing the process and characteristics of good mentoring followed by Heather Wynne, Kenneth Cuthbert, and Carlos R.
The Boren Mentoring Initiative is named for Oklahoma Foundation for Excellence founder and chairman David Boren and his wife, Molly.
The terms teacher, coach and mentor are often used interchangeably; however, there is a difference between the term coaching and the term mentoring. (5) Five key differences:
In short, school leaders need to communicate early, often, and effectively about the purposes of and expectations for individual mentoring sessions and for the mentoring program as whole.
As the title suggests, the book examines "best practices" in mentoring. The editors' choice of topics gives the readers a comprehensive look at career mentoring throughout their educational journey.
According to Mentor: The National Mentoring Partnership (2017), "Mentoring, at its core, guarantees young people that there is someone who cares about them, assures them they are not alone in dealing with day-to-day challenges, and makes them feel like they matter."

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