mentor

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mentor

 [men´tor] (pl. men·tor)
a person with more experience in a given area who takes responsibility for helping someone with less experience to develop needed knowledge and skills.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

mentor

A professional and role model who advises and provides feedback for a junior colleague. Mentors may be a resource for career advancement, graduate clinical, research and publishing opportunities, funding, credential support, and obtaining tenure-track positions.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mentor

Graduate education  A professional and a role model who gives attention and feedback to a junior colleague
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, many of the mentors said that when they contacted their mentees, the mentees were not interested in being mentored. The mentees, meanwhile, said they were never contacted by their mentors.
* music--Johann Christian Bach mentored Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
What's more, mentored employees are more committed, both to their organizations and to their careers.
Remember, the person being mentored needs help learning the ways of the business world or a specific area in their career.
Accordingly, the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award forms an important part of an initiative to attract talented individuals with highly developed quantitative skills to the challenges of research relevant to the mission of NIH.
Much of the literature on children mentored in schools describes the use of adults from the community participating in the school as volunteer mentors of a t-risk children (Ryan, Whittaker, & Pinckney, 2002; Townsel, 1997).
(2000) reported that not all students or emerging professionals are mentored. Johnson and Huwe (2003) recognized this disparity and added that those who were mentored "worked at initiating the relationship" (p.
These students usually have independent work habits, a strong grasp of subject matter, and a desire to be mentored (Roberts & Inman, 2001).
Where youth with disabilities are mentored, the mentors and employers learn about the students' capabilities in spite of any disabilities they may have.
My experiences of mentoring have changed in that I have been mentored by both peers and professionals, young and old, and in and outside of my field.
At the other end of the spectrum, some people claim to have been mentored by strangers during chance encounters, by the biographies of famous people, and even by characters in novels.

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