mentalese


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mentalese

(mĕn′tl-ēz′, -lēs′)
n.
A hypothetical language in which concepts and propositions are represented in the mind without words.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, we can be sure that research into semantics, whether considered as "mentalese" or in more formal terms, will continue to empty the scientific budgets of many states.
[meaning.sub.L] of a word with a private "Mentalese" item, but
(1994), The Elm and the Expert: Mentalese and Its Semantics.
If thought coincides with language, there is in each of us one true language, and this is not the English or German with which we may have grown up but mentalese, (5) or the language of thought.
There is still no consensus on whether it is merely a stifled form of language or a kind of mentalese preceding articulation, a line of inquiry that leads to an enduring dilemma in the philosophy of language: the status of thinking in words.
Representationism, realism and the redundancy of 'mentalese.' Theory & Psychology, 1(2), 163-185.
As Pinker (1994) and many others have observed, the mentalese (or language of thought) must be very different from the structure of languages used to exchange information when we employ our senses as a medium.
(57.) For an example of this way of thinking, see STEVEN PINKER, THE LANGUAGE INSTINCT 44-74 (1994) (discussing the preverbal language of "mentalese").
Nor can the contemporary Cartesian advert to the tokening of Mentalese symbols (or to brain states).
In The Language of Thought [1975], Fodor argued that computational approaches to psychology presuppose that there is an internal system of representation - a 'language of thought,' or 'Mentalese' - with a structure and richness comparable to natural languages.
Carruthers aims to undermine the Fodorean claim that "all thought is conducted in sentences of Mentalese" (p.
(Although a 10,000-word active vocabulary is typical for a high-school graduate, a good reader can understand at least four times as many.) We will also allow a "mentalese dictionary" of similar size for the internal language of thought (see Table II).