intelligence

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intelligence

 [in-tel´ĭ-jens]
the ability to comprehend or understand. It is basically a combination of reasoning, memory, imagination, and judgment; each of these faculties relies upon the others. Intelligence is not an entity within a person but a combination of cognitive skills and knowledge made evident by behaviors that are adaptive.

In speaking of general intelligence, authorities often distinguish between a number of different kinds of basic mental ability. One of these is verbal aptitude, the ability to understand the meaning of words and to use them effectively in writing or speaking. Another is skill with numbers, the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide and to use these skills in problems. The capacity to work with spatial relationships, that is, with visualizing how objects take up space, is still another (for example, how two triangles can fit together to make a square). Perception, memory, and reasoning may also be considered different basic abilities.

These abilities are the ones that are usually examined by intelligence tests. There are others, however, that may be as important or more important. Determination and perseverance make intelligence effective and useful. Artistic talent, such as proficiency in art or music, and creativity, the ability to use thought and imagination to produce original ideas, are difficult to measure but are certainly part of intelligence.
intelligence quotient (I.Q.) a numerical expression of intellectual capacity obtained by multiplying the mental age of the subject, ascertained by testing, by 100 and dividing by his or her chronologic age.
intelligence test a set of problems or tasks posed to assess an individual's innate ability to judge, comprehend, and reason.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jens),
1. A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment, especially in relation to the extent of one's perceived effectiveness in meeting challenges.
2. In psychology, a person's relative standing on two quantitative indices, measured intelligence and effectiveness of adaptive behavior; a quantitative score or similar index on both indices constitutes the operational definition of intelligence.
[L. intelligentia]

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jĕns)
1. A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment, especially in meeting challenges and solving problems.
2. psychology A person's relative standing on two quantitative indices, those that measured intelligence and the effectiveness of adaptive behavior; a quantitative score or similar index on both indices constitutes the operational definition of intelligence.

intelligence

A group of separate, but correlated, abilities, such as memory, speed of perception of relationships, verbal skills, numerical skills and visuo-spatial perception, each of which is present to a varying degree. There is no single entity which may be described as raw, undifferentiated intelligence. The IQ (INTELLIGENCE QUOTIENT), which attempts to quantify these abilities, generally equates well with scholastic performance and with subsequent success in business or professional life, but a severe deficiency in motivation may nullify a high IQ.

intelligence

the ability to understand and create abstract ideas. Tests to measure intelligence are rather unreliable since it is not possible to separate completely environmental influences (such as schooling and social background) from innate ability. Nevertheless, such tests are widely used, producing a measure called the Intelligence Quotient (IQ) which is:

actual age Thus, if a person has an average mental age for his age-group he will have an I.Q. score of 100. The HERITABILITY of intelligence is thought to be between 0.5 and 0.7.

in·tel·li·gence

(in-tel'i-jĕns)
A person's aggregate capacity to act purposefully, think rationally, and deal effectively with the environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
Selection of gifted children should be made exclusively from mental tests as ratings by teachers and administrators were unreliable.
The usefulness of mental tests, apparent and real, was perhaps their most obvious characteristic over the 20th century.
The new scientific consensus that the major mental tests are not biased against native-born English-speaking minorities has shifted even lay opinion to some extent.
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To support this idea, Dutton digs into research about what the psychopathic brain does--or doesn't do --when confronted with mental tests and moral conundrums.
After 12 months, there seemed to be no difference between the groups in how well people scored on mental tests, including memory, attention and speed.
He had to face two hours of complex mental tests before winning back his driving licence.
But when the volunteers were tested again at 64 years old, smokers performed significantly worse in five mental tests than either former smokers or those who had never smoked.
Most of these studies used a group of mental tests to determine how well patients processed and understood information.