mental life

mental life

An obsolete term that formerly encompassed the functional activity related to sensation, reasoning and voluntary action.
References in classic literature ?
(I am speaking within the circle of conventional doctrines, not expressing my own beliefs.) This direction towards an object is commonly regarded as typical of every form of cognition, and sometimes of mental life altogether.
It was too early yet for her fully to recognize or at least admit the change, still more for her to have readjusted that devotedness which was so necessary a part of her mental life that she was almost sure sooner or later to recover it.
All the earliest products of these processes of 'popular' and minstrel composition are everywhere lost long before recorded literature begins, but the processes themselves in their less formal stages continue among uneducated people (whose mental life always remains more or less primitive) even down to the present time.
I always shrank from the sight of a new person, and all the more when it was a person whose mental life was likely to weary my reluctant insight with worldly ignorant trivialities.
The virtual cessation of postal distribution and the collapse of all newspaper enterprise had left an immense and aching gap in the mental life of this time.
criteria may be relevant to the belief that locked-in patients are fully conscious, why are not electroencephalographic data also relevant to judgments concerning whether or not some alleged persistent vegetative patients possess some sort of conscious mental life? It is tempting to wonder whether or not some patients that are diagnosed as being in a persistent vegetative state and who have "considerable activity" (including alpha rhythms) on their electroencephalograms might, in actuality, be very much like persistently locked-in patients.
Established theories that assume unconscious rules guide mental life received a philosophical challenge (142: 264).
Mental life consists of conscious states and those neurophysiological processes that, under the right circumstances, generate conscious states, he argues.
Likewise the One does not act, but is actuality, and does not think and is not an intellect, but is "mental life." The same dynamic is true for the forms as well.
Hawking lived a most active mental life even though he was confined to a wheelchair for most of his adult life due to ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease, living to the ripe old age of 76 (six more years than the biblical 'three score and ten') while confounding conventional medical wisdom, which opined that he wouldn't live past 30.
I imagine he will go down in the history of cognitive science as the person who most decidedly attempted to clear up the doubts raised by Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) about the possibility that psychology (as the study of mental life) could acquire the status of a scientific discipline.