impression

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impression

 [im-presh´un]
1. a slight indentation or depression, as one produced in the surface of one organ by pressure exerted by another.
2. a negative imprint of an object made in some plastic material that later solidifies.
3. an effect produced upon the mind, body, or senses by some external stimulus or agent.
basilar impression

im·pres·sion

(im-presh'ŭn),
1. A mark seemingly made by pressure of one structure or organ on another, seen especially during cadaveric dissections. See also groove for the various impressions of the lungs, for example, descending aorta, subclavian artery, and vena cava. Synonym(s): impressio [TA]
2. An effect produced on the mind by some external objects acting through the organs of sense. Synonym(s): mental impression
3. An imprint or negative likeness; especially, the negative form of the teeth and/or other tissues of the oral cavity, made in a plastic material that becomes relatively hard or set while in contact with these tissues, made to reproduce a positive form or cast of the recorded tissues; classified, according to the materials of which they are made, as reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression, modeling plastic impression, plaster impression, and wax impression.
[L. impressio, fr. im- primo, pp. -pressus, to press upon]

impression

(ĭm-prĕsh′ən)
n.
Dentistry An imprint of the teeth and surrounding tissues, formed with a plastic material that hardens into a mold for use in making dentures, inlays, or plastic models.

im·pres·sion

(im-presh'ŭn)
1. A mark seemingly made by the pressure of one structure or organ on another, seen especially in cadaveric dissections. See also groove for the various impressions of the lungs, e.g., descending aorta, subclavian artery, and vena cava.
2. An effect produced on the mind by some external object acting through the organs of sense.
3. An imprint or negative likeness; especially, the negative form of the teeth and/or other tissues of the oral cavity, made in a plastic material that becomes relatively hard or set while in contact with these tissues, made to reproduce a positive form or cast of the recorded tissues; classified, according to the materials of which they are made, as reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression, modeling elastic gel impression, plaster impression, and wax impression.
Synonym(s): impressio [TA] .
[L. impressio, fr. im- primo, pp. -pressus, to press upon]

impression

In dentistry, a negative mould of the teeth or other mouth structures, made in plastic, which is later filled with Plaster of Paris to provide a perfect copy of the anatomy.

Impression

An imprint of the upper or lower teeth made in a pliable material that sets. When this material has hardened, it may be filled with plaster, plastic, or artificial stone to make an exact model of the teeth.
Mentioned in: Malocclusion

im·pres·sion

(im-presh'ŭn)
1. [TA] An imprint or negative likeness; especially, negative form of the teeth and/or other tissues of the oral cavity, made in a plastic material that becomes relatively hard or set while in contact with these tissues, made to reproduce a positive form or cast of the recorded tissues; classified, according to the materials of which they are made, as reversible and irreversible hydrocolloid impression, modeling plastic impression, plaster impression, and wax impression.
2. [TA] Mark seemingly made by pressure of one structure or organ on another, seen especially during cadaveric dissections.
3. Effect produced on the mind by some external objects acting through the organs of sense.
[L. impressio, fr. im- primo, pp. -pressus, to press upon]
References in periodicals archive ?
Do not provide written communications to an expert containing mental impressions, opinions or theories with the materials you offer the expert.
1970) (in which the state's high court declared that the Rules of Civil Procedure were intended to prevent the use of surprise, tricking, bluff, and legal gymnastics), while preserving the Hickman and Smith type protections of counsel mental impressions and processes.
Moreover, the work product doctrine applies to the identification of documents that reveal counsel's mental impressions and trial strategy.(29)
However, any backup research or memoranda reflecting mental impressions, thought processes, likelihood of success, etc., may be eligible for the Confidentiality Privilege; alternatively, the work-product doctrine is more likely to protect these items, because the controversy with the IRS may indicate that they were prepared for litigation.
The risk manager's work product memoranda, which contained her mental impressions of information from witnesses, were therefore found to be the work product of an attorney, as well as an attorney/client communication.
The question was whether that phrase was meant to apply only to the first sentence of that paragraph (the general work produce rule providing that materials prepared in anticipation of trial are discoverable only upon a showing of need), or if it was also meant to apply to the second sentence (the opinion work product rule providing that an attorney's mental impressions are not discoverable notwithstanding a showing of substantial need).
Counsel for insurance companies argue that since your expert worked in a sensitive position with the carrier either just before the claim was filed or actually during the claim handling, the adjuster is tainted by possessing the mental impressions, legal theories, and information prepared in anticipation of litigation in your case.
"Under FIN 48, public companies must evaluate each tax position taken on their returns to determine whether those positions are supported by technical authority that, in the opinion of the company, would 'more likely than not' be sustained by a taxing authority." This process often results in detailed written analyses of numerous tax issues, including the likelihood of succeeding in litigation and the related mental impressions of tax professionals including both accountants and attorneys.
Taylor, 329 US 495 (1947), protects documents, interviews, statements, memoranda, correspondence, briefs, mental impressions and other tangible items prepared by an attorney in anticipation of litigation.
While exceptions to the work product doctrine exist, the opposing party may not seek to learn the mental impressions, conclusions or opinions of an attorney through discovery.