mensuration

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mensuration

 [men″su-ra´shun]
the process of measuring.

men·su·ra·tion

(men'sū-rā'shŭn),
The act or process of measuring.
[L. mensuratio, fr. mensuro, to measure]

mensuration

(mĕn-sū-rā′shŭn) [L. mensuratio]
The process of measuring.
References in periodicals archive ?
Particularly admirable is her marshalling of evidence to justify all four of the different mensuration signs associated with Ockeghem's rondeau 'L'aultre d'antan', while concluding that Ockeghem's originally intended sign was C3.
This suggests to me that Berger should have dealt first with proportions (in the single line alone or simultaneously with change of mensuration in all voices) and then moved on to diminution by stroke and mode signs and finally to issues involving equal breve and semibreve - in other words, the chapters should have appeared in the order 6, 5, 3, 4.
1318-19), which is the earliest theoretical reference to mensuration signs that I know of.
For instance, could not the use of a single dot in a mensuration sign just as easily have evolved from the punctus perfectionis as from any external tradition (i.e., its presence means perfection while its absence means imperfection)?
Prosdocimus de Beldemandis reported mensuration signs for the major mode c.
Chapter 2, 'The Origins of the Mensural System and Mensuration Signs' (which was read as a scholarly paper at international meetings in 1990-91), presents the argument that early fourteenth-century French and Italian mensural systems bear a significant relationship to the system of Roman fractions, and that the circle and semicircle of French practice derive from the signs for 'one' and 'one half' on the Roman hand abacus.
Here, Berger's claim about the mensural signs O and C reads: 'I have been able to demonstrate that the mensuration signs derive from the symbols associated with Roman fractions [on the Roman hand abacus]' (p.
In any case, the tempo at `Et resurrexit' leads to a situation whereby the same mensuration is interpreted at notated semibreve = 40 in one section (`Et incarnatus est'), and at notated semibreve = 60 in the next.
The French mensuration signs for these divisiones are C and ??
1993 Anna Maria Busse Berger, Mensuration and proportion signs, Oxford