menstruant


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men·stru·ant

(men'strū-ănt),
Menstruating.

menstruant

adjective Menstruating; referring to menstruation.
 
noun A person who menstruates.

menstruant

(mĕn′stroo-ănt) [L. menstruare, to discharge the menses]
1. In the condition of menstruating.
2. One who menstruates.
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References in periodicals archive ?
183) The restrictions on menstruants that surfaced first within Christianity in the canonical letters of Dionysius of Alexandria (184) in the mid-third century became canon law for the Byzantine Church in 692 through the Council in Trullo, (185) which adopted wholesale the canonical writings of a dozen bishops, including Dionysius and his later successor, Timothy, who similarly restricted menstruous women from receiving the Eucharist or even entering the church.
To this end, statements about menstruants in this body of writings enable her "to make some of the rabbinic discussions accessible to students and scholars of feminist criticism, and to students of the complex interaction between cultural groups in late antiquity as well as scholars of rabbinic texts" (13).
Perez's text indicates that the crucial issue with which he is dealing is the intention of the parties, rather than the physical definitions of the offenses of sexual relations with a menstruant and adultery.
Yet just a year later, Deikinaak'w continued, Shadow House was entirely crushed by an advancing glacier when a young, secluded menstruant angered it by speaking carelessly.
69b) - the impurity of the corpses of a man with a bodily discharge, a woman with a bodily discharge, a menstruant, a woman who has given birth, or a leper (all unclean according to biblical law when they are still living) derives 'only from the words of the scribes'.
6) include the two main risk factors for EAHE: (i) menstruant females moving at a pace slower than the average for most competitors; and (ii) a history of high fluid intake during the race.
By observing Karaite practice, including the exclusion of menstruant women from certain rituals, and by engaging Karaite women in conversation about their experiences as Karaite women, in both their personal roles as wives and mothers and their public roles as members of a Karaite community, and by applying interpretative techniques derived from contemporary social sciences, the author presents conclusions about the larger significance of the Karaite rituals.
114/732), (49) as to whether a person in a state of major impurity (junub) or a menstruant (ha'id)--who in the ritual system would also be in a state of janaba--may handle the codex while it is in a covering (khiba).
Thus, for example, while it is the case that those afflicted with a "flow" or menstruant women are themselves considered ritually impure and pass on such impurity by contact (see Lev 15:3-12, 24), someone guilty of the moral crimes addressed by Lev 18, which can cause Gentiles impurity (Lev 18:24
This interrelationship between these bodily fluids is discussed in a chapter concerning the menstruant, niddah, and the woman who has given birth, yoledah.
This is partly due to what we now recognize as the broader scope of the legal section, encompassing laws regarding priests, scale disease, and zab, menstruant and parturient women, marriage and sotah, harvest and tithes, and impurity and purification.
At least in Christ's account this feminine connectedness with nature is not only because of biology--women's 'unique position as menstruants, birthgivers'--but also because women 'have traditionally cared for the young and the dying' (77).