menstrual cup


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menstrual cup

n.
A rubber cup that is inserted into the vagina and placed over the cervix to collect menstrual flow.

menstrual cup

A reusable cup-shaped device made of latex, silicone or thermoplastic elastome, which is placed inside the vagina, held in place by suction and used to collect menstrual flow in lieu of absorbent pads. Menstrual cups are more cost-efficient and environmentally friendly than tampons, as most are reusable, and they are the method of choice for heavy menstrual bleeding.

menstrual cup

Gynecology A reusable, cup-shaped device placed inside the vagina, held in place by suction and used to collect menstrual flow. See Menstruation.
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Some 70 percent of women who have tried menstrual cups said they would like to continue using them, researchers reported in The Lancet Public Health, a peer-reviewed medical journal.
Certain types of women may also find fitting a menstrual cup a bit more complicated, Wu said.
Distribution of cloth pads or menstrual cups on subsidised rates or even free shall not only provide safe periods, reduce menstrual waste but shall reduce the cost gradually, considering the shelf life of both the products.
While menstrual cups have existed for decades, P&G says that more women are considering cups as part of their period routines, yet many still feel like current options don't meet their protection and comfort needs.
Keela founder Jane Hartman Adame got the idea for a new cup because she has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a connective tissue disorder that makes it hard for her to remove other menstrual cups.
'I first came across menstrual cups while I was living in a tree house in Laos.
"Retailers continue to see the growth of reusable menstrual cups in the category, and we see a trend of alternative-channel retailers adding our product to their shelves."
To Kiran Gandhi, a musician and activist who made headlines in August 2015 for running the London Marathon while bleeding freely, Kaur's work is an act of "radical activism." So, too, is the work of other artists helping nudge periods into the light: Argentinian artist Fannie Sosa incorporates menstrual cup advocation into her video work and teachings, while Los Angeles illustrator Faye Orlove included a diagram showing how to insert a tampon in her animated video for Mitski's "Townie" earlier this year.
Meet LENA, the latest reusable menstrual cup to hit the feminine health care market.
Internal menstrual protection: Use of a safe and sanitary menstrual cup. Obstet Gynecol 1959; 13(5):539-543.
This is her unofficial plug to consider menstrual cups when you're looking for your next menstrual product.
She further noted that little is known about the prevalence of menstrual cup use today, as most studies on this product were done in the 1960s and focused on acceptability.