meniscus


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Related to meniscus: meniscus tear

meniscus

 [mĕ-nis´kus] (L.)
something of crescent shape, as the concave or convex surface of a column of liquid in a pipet or medication cup, or a crescent-shaped fibrocartilage (semilunar cartilage) in the knee joint. adj., adj menis´cal.
Measuring medication at the meniscus. From Lammon et al., 1996.

me·nis·cus

, pl.

me·nis·ci

(mĕ-nis'kŭs, mĕ-nis'sī),
1. Synonym(s): meniscus lens
2. A crescentic intraarticular fibrocartilage found in certain joints.
3. A crescentic fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee and the acromioclavicular, sternoclavicular, and temporomandibular joints.
[G. mēniskos, crescent]

meniscus

(mə-nĭs′kəs)
n. pl. me·nisci (-nĭs′ī, -kī, -kē) or me·niscuses
1. A crescent-shaped body.
2. A concavo-convex lens.
3. The curved upper surface of a nonturbulent liquid in a container that is concave if the liquid wets the container walls and convex if it does not.
4. A cartilage disk that acts as a cushion between the ends of bones that meet in a joint.

me·nis′cal (-kəl), me·nis′cate′ (-kăt′)(-koid′)(mĕn′ĭs-koid′l), me·nis′coid′ (-koid′)(mĕn′ĭs-koid′l), men′is·coi′dal (mĕn′ĭs-koid′l) adj.

meniscus

Either of two crescent-shaped cartilages atop the tibial plates that stabilise the knee, absorb shock, assist joint lubrication and limit joint flexion/extension.

me·nis·cus

, pl. menisci (mĕ-niśkŭs, -kī) [TA]
1. Synonym(s): meniscus lens.
2. [TA] Any crescent-shaped structure.
3. A crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee, theacromio- and sternoclavicular and the temporomandibular joints.
4. The crescentic curvature of the surface of a liquid standing in a narrow vessel (e.g., pipette, burette).
[G. mēniskos, crescent]

meniscus

  1. the top of a liquid column made either concave or convex by capillarity.
  2. an intervertebral disc of fibro-cartilage.

me·nis·cus

, pl. menisci (mĕ-niskŭs, -kī) [TA]
1. [TA] Any crescent-shaped structure.
2. A crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee, the acromio- and sternoclavicular and the temporomandibular joints.
3. The crescentic curvature of the surface of a liquid standing in a narrow vessel.
Synonym(s): meniscus lens.
[G. mēniskos, crescent]

Patient discussion about meniscus

Q. I am scheduled for scope surgery for a torn meniscus on my knee and what is the duration for recovery? Has anyone had this surgery for a torn meniscus? How did you deal with this recovery?

A. The recovery process is individual, and you cannot predict it in advance. I know someone who has done it and was able to go back to exercising regularly after 2 months. I would think the recovery from the surgery itself is a matter of few weeks until you can walk properly, however you should still give your knee a break and rest for a while after.

More discussions about meniscus
References in periodicals archive ?
He further added: "The meniscus acts as a shock absorber and plays a vital role in the stability, lubrication and position of the knee.
[4] reported that 94% of popliteal cysts are related to intra-articular knee pathologies, with meniscus and cartilage-based pathologies constituting the majority.
Utilising the company's easy-to-use system, an all-suture implant, with no knot in the joint space, more surgeons will choose to repair the meniscus instead of removing it.
Upon placement in the meniscus tissue of a cow, the matrix complied and bone stem cells migrated to the scaffold to begin the reconstruction.
(17-20) The morphology of the attachment of the anterior root of the medial meniscus varies.
This review will summarize existing cell-free techniques for meniscus repair and regeneration, specifically those that recruit endogenous stem/progenitor cells.
The interface separating a molten salt and an atmospheric gas in a small container is not a flat interface but should be either concave or convex meniscus (Figure 1) due to the force balance along the interface.
In the current study, we examined the morphological changes in the meniscus and the tibial plateau quantitatively in human foetuses.
Out of the 70 cases in this study, 28 patients (40%) had medial meniscus and 27 patients (38.57%) had lateral meniscus tears on MRI.
Partial medial menisectomy is an alternative procedure to treat meniscal tear, after conservative management fails and indication for meniscus repair is not there.
Meniscus tears often occur during sports practice, when players curl or twist around its own axis, causing a rupture.