meniscus

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meniscus

 [mĕ-nis´kus] (L.)
something of crescent shape, as the concave or convex surface of a column of liquid in a pipet or medication cup, or a crescent-shaped fibrocartilage (semilunar cartilage) in the knee joint. adj., adj menis´cal.
Measuring medication at the meniscus. From Lammon et al., 1996.

me·nis·cus

, pl.

me·nis·ci

(mĕ-nis'kŭs, mĕ-nis'sī),
1. Synonym(s): meniscus lens
2. A crescentic intraarticular fibrocartilage found in certain joints.
3. A crescentic fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee and the acromioclavicular, sternoclavicular, and temporomandibular joints.
[G. mēniskos, crescent]

meniscus

(mə-nĭs′kəs)
n. pl. me·nisci (-nĭs′ī, -kī, -kē) or me·niscuses
1. A crescent-shaped body.
2. A concavo-convex lens.
3. The curved upper surface of a nonturbulent liquid in a container that is concave if the liquid wets the container walls and convex if it does not.
4. A cartilage disk that acts as a cushion between the ends of bones that meet in a joint.

me·nis′cal (-kəl), me·nis′cate′ (-kăt′)(-koid′)(mĕn′ĭs-koid′l), me·nis′coid′ (-koid′)(mĕn′ĭs-koid′l), men′is·coi′dal (mĕn′ĭs-koid′l) adj.

meniscus

Either of two crescent-shaped cartilages atop the tibial plates that stabilise the knee, absorb shock, assist joint lubrication and limit joint flexion/extension.

me·nis·cus

, pl. menisci (mĕ-niśkŭs, -kī) [TA]
1. Synonym(s): meniscus lens.
2. [TA] Any crescent-shaped structure.
3. A crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee, theacromio- and sternoclavicular and the temporomandibular joints.
4. The crescentic curvature of the surface of a liquid standing in a narrow vessel (e.g., pipette, burette).
[G. mēniskos, crescent]

meniscus

  1. the top of a liquid column made either concave or convex by capillarity.
  2. an intervertebral disc of fibro-cartilage.

me·nis·cus

, pl. menisci (mĕ-niskŭs, -kī) [TA]
1. [TA] Any crescent-shaped structure.
2. A crescent-shaped fibrocartilaginous structure of the knee, the acromio- and sternoclavicular and the temporomandibular joints.
3. The crescentic curvature of the surface of a liquid standing in a narrow vessel.
Synonym(s): meniscus lens.
[G. mēniskos, crescent]

Patient discussion about meniscus

Q. I am scheduled for scope surgery for a torn meniscus on my knee and what is the duration for recovery? Has anyone had this surgery for a torn meniscus? How did you deal with this recovery?

A. The recovery process is individual, and you cannot predict it in advance. I know someone who has done it and was able to go back to exercising regularly after 2 months. I would think the recovery from the surgery itself is a matter of few weeks until you can walk properly, however you should still give your knee a break and rest for a while after.

More discussions about meniscus
References in periodicals archive ?
The study findings were limited by several factors, including the relatively small sample size, uncertain timing of disease onset, a potentially limited definition of a destabilizing meniscal tear (defined as a root tear, radial tear, or complex tear), a lack of a universal AKOA pathology, and some missing MRI data, the researchers noted.
A logistic regression model was used to assess the effect of age and sex on the probability of a patient having a medial meniscal tear.
"Based on these results, PT may be considered an alternative to surgery for patients with nonobstructive meniscal tears," the authors write.
In fact, one study showed that functional recovery at preoperative levels is possible within 4 to 6 weeks, but the quadriceps function is not completed without physical therapy because it is weaker than contralateral for more than 12 weeks as a result of a meniscal remodeling.
Joint effusions, meniscal lesions, articular cartilage lesions, BME, and ligament damage were included in the assessment.
Meniscal root insertion site anatomy is well described.
Finally, we discuss important recruitment factors for meniscal repair and regeneration.
The aim of this study was to assess the concentration profiles of relevant knee synovial cytokines (IL-1[beta], IL-1ra, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-[alpha]) in an injured adolescent population relative to time from trauma, growth plate maturity, and presence or absence of meniscal tear.
Quantitative methods included measurement of JSW (narrowest width between femoral condyle and tibial plateau in millimeters), cartilage thickness (greatest width in millimeters), and meniscal thickness (greatest width in millimeters).
The ratio of the lateral meniscal area to the lateral articular surface area of the tibia and that of the medial meniscal area to the medial articular surface areas of the tibia were calculated.
[6-10] Although experienced surgeon can determine the presence of meniscal and ligament injuries through physical examination, MRI is recommended to avoid unrequired arthroscopies which results from false positive physical tests, especially in presence of multiple injuries.