meningococcus

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Related to meningococci: meningococcal vaccine, pneumococci

meningococcus

 [mĕ-ning″go-kok´us]
a microorganism of the species Neisseria meningitidis, the cause of some types of meningitis. adj., adj meningococ´cal.

Neis·se·ri·a me·nin·gi·'ti·dis

a bacterial species found in the nasopharynx of humans but not in other animals; the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis and meningicoccemia; virulent organisms are strongly gram negative and occur singly or in pairs; in the latter case the cocci are elongated and are arranged with long axes parallel and facing sides kidney shaped; groups characterized by serologically specific capsular polysaccharides are designated by capital letters (the main serogroups being A, B, C, and D).

meningococcus

/me·nin·go·coc·cus/ (mĕ-ning″go-kok´us) pl. meningococ´ci   an individual organism of Neisseria meningitidis. meningococ´calmeningococ´cic

meningococcus

(mə-nĭng′gə-kŏk′əs, -nĭn′jə-)
n. pl. meningo·cocci (-kŏk′sī, -kī)
A bacterium (Neisseria meningitidis) that causes cerebrospinal meningitis.

me·nin′go·coc′cal (-kŏk′əl), me·nin′go·coc′cic (-kŏk′sĭk) adj.

meningococcus

[mining′gōkok′əs] pl. meningococci [-kok'sī]
Etymology: Gk, meninx + kokkos, berry
a bacterium of the genus Neisseria meningitidis, a nonmotile gram-negative diplococcus, frequently found in the nasopharynx of asymptomatic carriers, that may cause septicemia or epidemic cerebrospinal meningitis. Meningococcal infections are not highly communicable. However, crowded conditions, such as may be found in army camps and college dormitories, concentrate the number of carriers and reduce individual resistance to the organism. Hemorrhagic skin lesions are significant clues to the diagnosis. Stained smears of these lesions or of cerebrospinal fluid must be examined quickly because meningococci are fragile and lyse readily. Early treatment with an appropriate antibiotic such as penicillin G is essential for cure. Contacts may receive prophylaxis with rifampin. Several meningococcal vaccines are available. See also meningitis. meningococcal, adj.

Neis·se·ri·a me·nin·gi·ti·dis

(nī-sēr'ē-ă men-in-jit'i-dis)
A species found in the nasopharynx; the causative agent of meningococcal meningitis. Virulent organisms are strongly gram-negative and occur singly or in pairs; in the latter case the cocci are elongated and are arranged with long axes parallel and facing sides kidney shaped. Groups characterized by serologically specific capsular polysaccharides are designated by capital letters (the main serogroups being A, B, C, and D).
Synonym(s): meningococcus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Serogroup B meningococci were isolated from 38 (36.
BioVeris' vaccine candidate portfolio addresses the need for vaccines against different organisms, including group A streptococci (of strep throat, impetigo, flesh-eating bacteria and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome), group B streptococci (of sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia in newborns and adults), group B meningococci (of sepsis, meningitis, and pneumonia at any age), and E.
Using an estimate that the prevalence of meningococci carriage among adults would be [approximately equal to] 18% ([+ or -] 5%), we calculated that -225 study participants from each refinery would be needed to analyze all variables.
meningitidis strains described here had successively emerged in southeastern China; furthermore, ST11 serogroup W meningococci were isolated from close contacts of the patients and from healthy carriers.
Group C Meningococci bacteria are responsible for major epidemics in both developed and developing countries globally.
Serological typing of meningococci by means of micro-precipitation.
Group C meningococci account for 35 to 40 percent of all cases and have caused an estimated 150 deaths in the 1998/1999 reporting period, more than half of all meningococcal related deaths.
Capsular switching represents a mechanism by which meningococci escape protective immunity directed at specific capsular polysaccharides (4).
Group C meningococci account for 35% to 45% of all cases and caused an estimated 150 deaths in the 1998/1999 reporting period, more than half of all meningococcal related deaths.
meningitidis was sent to the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Meningococci in Oslo, Norway, for molecular analyses, as described (www.
The carrier protein selected by the Company for its meningococcal conjugate vaccine products has the potential to elicit antibodies that may impede this mechanism for meningococci and gonococci bacterial infections.
Meningococci usually persist on the nasopharyngeal mucosa of asymptomatic carriers (2).