meningococcal meningitis


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me·nin·go·coc·cal men·in·gi·tis

an acute infectious disease of children and young adults, caused by Neisseria meningitidis and characterized by fever, headache, photophobia, vomiting, nuchal rigidity, seizures, coma, and a purpuric eruption. Even in the absence of meningitis, meningococcemia can induce toxic phenomena such as vasculitis, disseminated intravascular coagulation, shock, and Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome due to adrenal hemorrhage; late complications include paralysis, mental retardation, and gangrene of the extremities.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

meningococcal meningitis

Meningeal infection by Neisseria meningitidis, primarily of children, typically of rapid onset after an upper respiratory tract infection (URI).
 
Epidemiology
More common in winter or spring, possibly with local epidemics at boarding schools or military bases.
 
Risk factors
Exposure to another person with meningococcal meningitis, recent URI.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

meningococcal meningitis

Neurology Meningeal infection by N meningococcus, primarily of children, typically of rapid onset after a URI Epidemiology Often in winter or spring, possibly with local epidemics at boarding schools or military bases Risk factors Exposure to another person with MM, recent URI. See Meningitis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

me·nin·go·coc·cal me·nin·gi·tis

(mĕ-ning'gō-kok'ăl men-in-jī'tis)
An acute infectious disease affecting children and young adults, caused by Neisseria meningitidis; characterized by nasopharyngeal catarrh, headache, vomiting, convulsions, stiffness in the neck (nuchal rigidity), photophobia, constipation, cutaneous hyperesthesia, a purpuric or herpetic eruption, and the presence of Kernig sign. Fulminant form may cause Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

meningococcal meningitis

An epidemic form of MENINGITIS, sometimes called cerebrospinal fever or spotted fever, and commoner in children than in adults. The organism responsible, Neisseria meningitidis , is spread by coughed or sneezed droplets. There is early leg pain, cold hands and feet, pallor or mottling of the skin, then a sore throat, fever, severe headache, marked neck stiffness and vomiting. A rash of red spots appears on the trunk and the affected person may be gravely ill within a day of onset and quickly become confused, drowsy and comatose. Without treatment, death may occur within days or even hours but an intensive course of antibiotics is usually successful, resulting in full recovery. Vaccines are available. Contacts are sometimes given protective antibiotics.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Rodrigues said, "The family is very grateful to the hospital, they want to thank the team of doctors that saved his life, and they want to spread awareness about the importance of vaccinations for meningococcal meningitis. He has been given all other vaccinations, but not this one."
Multiple cerebral sinus thromboses complicating meningococcal meningitis: a pediatric case report.
The most common symptoms of meningococcal meningitis include a stiff neck, high fever, purple rash, sensitivity to light, headaches and vomiting, which can resemble influenza or other viral infections.
To ward off meningococcal meningitis, wash hands with soap and water frequently, maintain good indoor ventilation, avoid staying in poorly ventilated rooms for long hours, and seek prompt medical attention when suspected symptoms developed, the agency aid.
pneumoniae has been previously documented as the predominant pathogen at the beginning of meningitis outbreaks in Ghana, and it is not uncommon to identify cases of pneumococcal meningitis during meningococcal meningitis outbreaks (6).
Evaluation of a rapid PCR test for the diagnosis of meningococcal meningitis. J Clin Microbiol 2003; 41: 3851-3.
Careful initial examination, close observation and high clinical suspicion may be required so that an atypical presentation, as well as, manifestation during the course of the disease is not overlooked, even after appropriate antibiotic treatment of meningococcal meningitis has occurred.
In order to control the outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis, three types of vaccines have been used, namely polysaccharide vaccines (bivalent, trivalent, tetravalent), vaccine against NmB, and conjugate vaccines against group C.
(For a look at the historical incidence of meningococcal meningitis from all serotypes, see the figure.
As anticipated according to the prevalent trends, since the beginning of 2015, a new outbreak of the meningococcal meningitis (caused predominantly by the serogroup-C) has been reported in Nigeria, in which 5855 cases, including 406 deaths (case fatality rate--7%) have been notified till the first half of May month [2,4].
It said "there are no confirmed cases of meningococcal meningitis in Dubai".
Summary: Dubai is free of meningococcal meningitis, clarifies Dubai Health Authority