meningeal

(redirected from meningeal worm)
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Related to meningeal worm: Parelaphostrongylus tenuis

meningeal

 [mĕ-nin´je-al]
pertaining to the meninges.

me·nin·ge·al

(mĕ-nin'jē-ăl, men'in-jē'ăl), Although the correct pronunciation is menin'geal, the pronunciation meninge'al is often heard in the U.S.
Relating to the meninges.

meningeal

(mə-nĭn′jē-əl)
adj.
Of or affecting the meninges.

meningeal

adjective Referring to the meninges, see there.

me·nin·ge·al

(me-nin'jē-ăl)
Relating to the meninges.

meninges

(mĕn-ĭn′jēz) meninx [Gr.]
1. Membranes.
Enlarge picture
MENINGES: Frontal section of top of skull
2. The three membranes covering the spinal cord and brain: dura mater (external), arachnoid (middle), and pia mater (internal). See: illustration
meningeal (mĕn-ĭn′jē-ăl), adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
The meningeal worm likely evolved in southern climes with its normal white-tailed deer host and may remain ill-adapted to long northern winters.
Meningeal worms are hair-like round worms that invade the spaces between the brain and surrounding tissue (the meninges).
Retroductive logic in retrospect: the ecological effects of meningeal worm. J.
Office files and the published literature were searched for evidence of the presence of meningeal worm in deer and moose, as well as cases of moose sickness attributed to meningeal worm infection in the KD and surrounding region.
However, current knowledge of the nature of moose declines and the biology of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) makes this parasite the most credible explanation.
Key words: Alces, meningeal worm, moose disease, moose sickness, parelaphostrongylosis, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis
In addition, Bill and his students produced original research on the meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) of white-tailed deer demonstrating its effects on wapiti and other ungulates native to western Canada and fought hard battles for the establishment of government policies that would prevent the translocation of this parasite from eastern North America where it is endemic.
Spatial segregation between moose and white-tailed deer at Voyageurs National Park may allow moose to persist despite the presence of meningeal worm (Parelaphostrongylus tenuis) in white-tailed deer.
This introduction led Professor Anderson to a long and productive series of scientific studies progressively revealing the importance of this parasite, known as the "meningeal worm" or Parelaphostrongylus tenuis.
Because some of the subsequent mortalities were attributed to meningeal worm, Parelaphostrongylus tenuis, a study was done in 1995-1996 to determine potential exposure of moose to this parasite.
Eric found that most dying moose were in a severely malnourished state, and often parasitized by liver flukes, meningeal worms, winter ticks, and various infectious diseases.