memory

(redirected from memorization)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to memorization: Rote memorization

memory

 [mem´o-re]
the mental faculty that enables one to retain and recall previously experienced sensations, impressions, information, and ideas. The ability of the brain to retain and to use knowledge gained from past experience is essential to the process of learning. Although the exact way in which the brain remembers is not completely understood, it is believed that a portion of the temporal lobe of the brain, lying in part under the temples, acts as a kind of memory center, drawing on memories stored in other parts of the brain.
impaired memory a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to remember bits of information or behavioral skills.
immunologic memory the capacity of the immune system to respond more rapidly and strongly to a subsequent antigenic challenge than to the first exposure. See also memory cells and immune response.
long-term memory the aspect of memory in which knowledge is stored permanently, to be activated when cued; it is theoretically unlimited in capacity.
recent memory the ability to recall events from the immediate past.
remote memory the ability to recall events from the distant past.
screen memory a consciously tolerable memory serving to conceal or “screen” another memory that might be disturbing or emotionally painful if recalled.
short-term memory what one is conscious of at a given moment; in contrast to long-term memory it is of limited capacity (about seven items) and will be lost unless rehearsed and related to information in long-term memory.

mem·o·ry

(mem'ŏ-rē),
1. General term for the recollection of that which was earlier experienced or learned.
2. The mental information processing system that receives (registers), modifies, stores, and retrieves informational stimuli; composed of three stages: encoding, storage, and retrieval.
[L. memoria]

memory

(mĕm′ə-rē)
n.
1. The mental faculty of retaining and recalling past experience based on the mental processes of learning, retention, recall, and recognition.
2. Persistent modification of behavior resulting from experience.
3. The ability of the immune system to produce a specific secondary response to an antigen that has been previously encountered.

memory

Immunology
An increase (“positive memory”) or decrease (“negative memory”) in the response of the immune system to an antigen after prior exposure.
 
Informatics
The data storage capacity of an electronic device or component, measured in RAM or ROM: RAM (random access memory) is that memory immediately available to the CPU, ranging to 1 gigabyte, which is “labile” and therefore lost when the device is turned off; ROM (read-only memory) is that memory which is “hard-wired” in specifically designed circuitry, comprising a form of permanent software.
 
Neurology
The persistence of the effects of learning and experiences on an organism’s behaviour, a process attributed to molecular transformation in incoming neuronal branches (dendritic trees).

Each neuron may receive as many as 200,000 signals, and since the sensory pattern probably stimulates relatively few sites on any “tree”, the numbers of patterns that may be stored are incalculable.

memory

Neurology The persistence of the effects of learning and experiences on an organism's behavior, a process attributed to molecular transformation in incoming neuronal branches–dendritic trees. See Emotional memory, Episodic memory, Long-term memory, Immediate memory, Procedural memory, Recent memory, Repressed memory, Semantic memory, Short-term memory, True memory, Visual memory, Working memory.

mem·o·ry

(mem'ŏ-rē)
1. Generally, recollection of that which was previously experienced or learned.
2. The mental information processing system that receives (registers), modifies, stores, and retrieves informational stimuli; composed of three stages: encoding, storage, and retrieval.

memory

The persistent effect on behaviour and thought of past experience. Short-term memory stores are small and the contents are soon lost unless repeatedly refreshed. Long-term memory stores are very large but are not always readily accessible. The physical basis of long-term memory has not yet been established, but most researchers seem to favour the circulating nerve impulse hypothesis rather than the idea of bit-coding by protein molecules.

memory

  1. the recollection of past events or previously learned skills after the passage of time.
  2. (in computing) the capacity of a computer usually expressed in ‘bytes’ or Ks, where K = 1024 bytes.

mem·o·ry

(mem'ŏ-rē)
1. General term for recollection of that which was earlier experienced or learned.
2. Mental information processing system that receives (registers), modifies, stores, and retrieves informational stimuli.

Patient discussion about memory

Q. What shall I give to eat for a good memory? My son forgets any given tasks very easily. With any given task either he will not complete the task or he will forget. His grandfather is having Alzheimer’s disease and I do not want him to suffer the same in his old age. What shall I give to eat for a good memory?

A. You can give him legumes, whole grains, green leafy vegetables, onions, almonds, salmon fish, sardine fish, berries, cherries, oranges, apples and plums. Reduction of diet rich in saturated fats after the age of 30 is also helpful. These foods provide with antioxidants, vitamins and good oils required for brain and its health. But don’t feed him with these foods only. Balanced diet plays a big role than anything else in this world. These are just supplements to support him not only for his brain but his whole body as well.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=04lpBKfxasw&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v04lpBKfxasw_brain_food?q=good%20memory%20diet&feature=player_embedded

Q. Which HERBAL medicine will increase my memory? I am reporter working for a familiar news channel with reputed name. The management trusts my words because I am very good in my memory. But for the past few months I am facing some memory loss and took some English medicine which is not much effective. So now I like to change my medication. Which HERBAL medicine will increase my memory?

A. Yes, Macska - I actually heard that that helps your memory a lot. Also math problems.

Q. Have food supplements like Ginkgo Biloba been proven to delay memory disorders?

A. Many people are interested in the health benefits of food supplements, hoping that natural substances can have the same efficacy as drugs. The answer to this specific question is NO. A recent study that was published after testing 3,000 people has shown no difference between those who took Ginkgo and those who didn’t. There is no food supplement, including Ginkgo Biloba that was scientifically proved to have the capacity to prevent or delay Dementia. Eating Romaine lattice, broccoli, cauliflower, and spinach have shown good results. Fish with Omega 3 have shown good results too.

More discussions about memory
References in periodicals archive ?
Dearth of published evidence in this context makes a case for designing an ex-post fecto study6 at Quaid-e-Azam Medical College, Bahawalpur to ascertain whether extensive rote memorization experience can influence academic achievement in terms of scores or not by comparing the scores of Hafiz-e-Quran and non-Hafiz-e-Quran students.
Memorization is a topic frequently discussed in my pre-college and collegiate studio, and I remember being guilty regarding reliance on muscle memory--our most faulty memory system.
What is important for the application to memorization is that the initial and final system states be arbitrary, so [y.sub.0] is allowed not to be equal to zero at all experimental situations.
He states that the "explain-practice-memorize" strategy is the main source of math anxiety because memorization is stressed instead of the understanding of concepts and reasoning.
This is so because the memorization of literature requires a specific disposition of the soul and a didactic capacity which only poetry is capable of providing.
Memorization itself is a source not only of intellectual discipline but also of spiritual companionship--the prayers or poems that one commits to memory can provide solace in times of stress.
Because the new approach emphasizes different tax skills, they will have to polish their own skills and modify and develop new teaching tools that emphasize research, planning and tax concepts, rather than rules and memorization. Their overall investment in the new approach will be crucial to students' success.
All of the phases require dedication, heavy memorization and in-depth study to achieve the required minimum.
Rather, rote learning, memorization of subject matter, and "what is on the test" may make up the total curriculum.
From the start, for example, it was clear that the exams were undermining the education of poor students by reducing their class work to the most simplistic memorization. The overall conflation of content and the lack of choice--as well as the virtual abandonment of creative excursions away from test material--reduced the curriculum to a dumbed-down, truncated education.
This anisotropy, which Appelle (1972) called the 'oblique effect', is nearly always present, whatever the variety of tasks used (detection, discrimination, identification, recognition, memorization; Appelle, 1972; Essock, 1980; Howard, 1982).
Parents complain, too, that their children reach middle school and can't multiply because teachers have been trained to emphasize "higher level thinking skills" rather the mundane memorization of the multiplication tables.