melanocytoma


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mel·a·no·cy·to·ma

(mel'ă-nō-sī-tō'mă),
1. A pigmented tumor of the uveal stroma.
2. Usually benign melanoma of the optic disc, appearing in markedly pigmented people as a small deeply pigmented tumor at the edge of the disc, sometimes extending into the retina and choroid; malignant metaplasia is rare.
[megalo- + cyto- + G. -oma; tumor]

melanocytoma

/mel·a·no·cy·to·ma/ (mel″ah-no-si-to´mah) a neoplasm or hamartoma composed of melanocytes.

mel·a·no·cy·to·ma

(mel'ă-nō-sī-tō'mă)
1. A pigmented tumor of the uveal stroma.
2. Usually benign melanoma of the optic disc, appearing in markedly pigmented people as a small deeply pigmented tumor at the edge of the disc, sometimes extending into the retina and choroid.
[melano- + cyto- + G. -oma; tumor]

melanocytoma

A harmless benign tumour, mainly of melanocytes, found on the OPTIC DISC, especially in black people.

melanocytoma

A benign, usually bilateral, pigmented tumour which is most commonly found in the optic disc arising from dendritic uveal melanocytes in the lamina cribrosa of the optic nerve head but may occur anywhere throughout the uveal tract. The patient's visual field presents an enlarged blind spot. The condition is more frequent in dark skinned people.

melanocytoma

References in periodicals archive ?
The nests and clusters of neoplastic cells as well as the sometimes high amount of dark brown pigmentation lead to the first assumption of a melanocytoma.
8% of the total number of examined dogs) and melanocytoma in 164 dogs (10% of the total number of examined dogs).
Ciliary body melanocytoma is also a deeply pigmented solid mass and more likely to display pigment dispersion and secondary glaucoma due to undergo central necrosis.
These neoplasms are divided into three main types including diffuse melanocytosis, melanocytoma and malignant melanoma.
Our pathologists thought this was most consistent with a melanocytoma diagnosis," and noted its rarity as well as its "uncertain biological behavior," said Dr.
There were seven cases of melanocytoma with few mitotic figures and five cases of malignant melanomas.
On the other hand, ZEMBOWICZ & MIHM (2004) considers that most of the histological variants recently introduced in the medical literature such as amelanotic/hypomelanotic blue naevus, amelanotic cellular blue naevus, epithelioid blue nevus, compound blue naevus, atypical blue naevus, pilar neurocristic hamartoma, blue naevus-like metastatic melanoma, pigmented epithelioid melanocytoma and cutaneous neurocristic harmatoma/ malignant neurocristic tumors could be classified as traditional categories of dendritic melanocytic proliferations.
Results: Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of 14 patients showed that 3 had optic nerve melanocytoma, 2 had chorodial melanoma, 1 had iridociliary medulloepithelioma, 1 had iris melanoma, 1 had trabecular meshwork melanoma, 1 had iris nevus, 1 had leukemic infiltration, 1 had lymphoma, 1 had neuroendocrine carcinoma,
In their opinion, the category of melanocytoma is an intermediate category, which would represent a biologically gray area; it includes some problematic lesions, such as epithelioid pigmented melanocytoma/animal type melanoma, atypical Spitz tumors, and atypical deep penetrating nevus, considered as MBITs.
I am not a dermatopathologist and will not weigh in on the diagnostic issues raised by Zembowicz and Scolyer (1) in their article in the March 2011 issue of Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, but their proposal to create a classification of melanocytoma for a primary, cutaneous melanocytic lesion of "intermediate malignant potential" is another step toward nosologic confusion.