melanic


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melanic

(mə-lăn′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or exhibiting melanism.
2. Of, relating to, or affected with melanosis; melanotic.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the analysis of data, there were used an analysis of differences according to pigmentation variants (melanic and albino) and temperature (17 [degrees]C, 25 [degrees]C and 35 [degrees]C) as a source of variation and interaction.
The sex differences discovered in terms of both the intensity of the melanic areas on the pronota and their relationship to size suggest male and female ladybirds may be under different pressures in terms of their use of available compounds for pigment production.
Some unclear points in previous research include melanic forms perching on white surfaces (Sargent 1968), which could be attributed to the fact that the melanism is not genetically linked to the behavior, which needs more time to be fixed by natural selection (Sargent 1985).
osae by the relatively much longer antennae (almost as long as the body, ca 3x head and pronotum together), the color of the hind knees (uniform reddish or purplish brown, with no pale patch on the external ventral lobe of the knee) and by the presence of melanic ornamentation on the distal portion of the male SAP (absent in C.
On average, the load of DRP and TP lost from the control treatment was significantly greater for the Recent Gley soil, followed by Pallic, Melanic, and Brown soils (Table 2).
The rise in melanic moths follows a J-shaped growth curve, but is this entirely realistic?
Another interesting discrepancy comes in the chapter "The Melanics: a Gang Profile Analysis," which mentions numerous incidents of violence inside the Michigan Department of Corrections by members of the Melanic Islamic Palace of the Rising Sun (MIPRS) that resulted in the deaths of other inmates and correctional officers.
Melanic Ilic, Susan Reid and Lynne Attwood (Houndmills, UK, 2004), 101.
(10) One of the great pioneers of early infant development, Melanic Klein, examined the emergence of a sense of self in infancy, and the characteristics of its successes and failures, in object relations theory (Klein, 1955/1994).
Conversely in less polluted rural woodland regions Kettlewell documented an inversion in melanic moth populations.
Melanic individuals were shown to be more active at low temperatures than individuals with paler coloration.