melancholia


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melancholia

 [mel″an-ko´le-ah]
depression; currently used particularly to describe severe cases of major depressive disorder. adj., adj melanchol´ic.

mel·an·cho·li·a

(mel'ăn-kō'lē-ă),
1. A severe form of depression marked by anhedonia, insomnia, psychomotor changes, and guilt.
2. A symptom occurring in other conditions, marked by depression of spirits and by a sluggish and painful process of thought.
Synonym(s): melancholy
[melan- + G. cholē, bile. See humoral doctrine]

melancholia

(mĕl′ən-kō′lē-ə)
n.
Extreme, persistent sadness or hopelessness; depression. No longer in clinical use.

mel′an·cho′li·ac (-lē-ăk′) adj. & n.

melancholia

Medical history
In ancient usage, melancholia encompassed schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.
 
Psychiatry
In modern use, melanocholia refers to an array of mental or emotional symptoms of depression or despondency, which are now subsumed under major and minor depression and dysthymia.

Psychoanalysis
Severe depression characterised by a loss of interest in life activities, early morning awakening with intensification of symptoms, variable functionality, anorexia, weight loss and inappropriate sense of guilt. 

Melancholia contrasts to prolonged mourning (melancholy); Freud viewed melancholia as an impoverishment of the ego as there is an internal loss, while in mourning the loss is external. Because of the internal loss, the melancholic ego appears empty and has a shattered self-esteem, due to reproach and attack from the superego. It is more common in women and is accompanied by helplessness and suicide attempts or ideation.

melancholia

melan, Greek, black; chole, bile Psychiatry Psychotic depression similar/identical to the depression of bipolar disease, characterized by severe depression, loss of interest in life activities, early morning awakening with intensification of Sx, marked ↑/↓ functionality, anorexia, weight loss, inappropriate sense of guilt. See Involutional melancholia. Cf Melancholy.

mel·an·cho·li·a

(mel-ăn-kō'lē-ă)
1. A severe form of depression marked by anhedonia, insomnia, psychomotor changes, and guilt.
2. A symptom occurring in other conditions, marked by depression of spirits and by a sluggish and painful process of thought.
Synonym(s): melancholy.
[melan- + G. cholē, bile]

melancholia

DEPRESSION.
References in periodicals archive ?
The third edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual classified melancholia a feature of depression.
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As such, the activation of the creative and emancipatory potential of melancholia in her last novel ought to be seen as a poignant, self-aware, and inconclusive effort "to speak to, or motivate, the vastly diversified whole that is humankind" (174).
Here, the idea that melancholia affected the upper classes more frequently than the commoner is explained as the burden of genius (p.
Last year, Dunst starred as a depressed bride in the acclaimed Lars Von Trier film "Melancholia." Her riveting performance earned her the best-actress award at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival.
Dr Lawlor says the fashionable illness project came to him when he was working on an earlier study of depression which resulted in a fascinating book, From Melancholia to Prozac: a history of depression*.
An Arab Melancholia is the second novel by Abdellah Taia to be translated and published by Semiotext(e).
Their latest album, E Volo Love, is admittedly a journey into a more poppier sound, but still it has a layer of melancholia.