megafauna


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megafauna

(mĕg′ə-fô′nə)
n. pl. megafauna or megafau·nas
Large or relatively large animals of a particular region, period, or habitat: Pleistocene megafauna; crabs and other aquatic megafauna.

meg′a·fau′nal adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
At that time, the area around the shelter at PeEas de las Trampas in the southern Andean Puna was thought to have been wetter than today, making it a suitable habitat for megafauna like giant ground sloths, and also smaller herbivores like American horses and South American camelids which the pumas may have preyed on.
He underscored the need to provide better livelihood opportunities to local fishers who were playing instrumental role in protecting marine megafauna.
Aerial surveys conducted in marine environments, either by manned aircraft or drones, have focused mainly on monitoring megafauna species that breach the surface; e.g., mammals and sea turtles (Marsh & Sinclair, 1989; Loughlin et al., 1992; Pollock et al., 2006; Koski et al., 2009).
"Although we once lived in a world of giants: giant beavers, giant armadillos, giant deer, etc, we now live in a world that is becoming increasingly impoverished of large wild mammalian species," says says Professor Jens-Christian Svenning from Aarhus University, who heads a large research program on megafauna.
These findings add to the evidence showing that prehistoric human colonization of Madagascar began between 1350 and 1100 years BP, and suggest that hunting gradually led to the extinction of the island's megafauna.
"Elephant birds were the biggest of Madagascar's megafauna and arguably one of the most important in the islands evolutionary history - even more so than lemurs," Hansford commented.
Brooke, 26, who dives in the bay daily as a research assistant mantas trying intern with the Marine Megafauna Foundation, said: "I had some guests diving with me at the time and I was embarrassed.
However, those who venture that assertion are clearly lacking a working comprehension of North American natural history and the effect that many tens of millions of now depleted megafauna had been maintaining fire-resilient ecosystems that were present back when fire was used by the Native Americans on the North American continent.
The authors of the study, entitled 'Satellite tracking of juvenile whale sharks in the Sulu and Bohol Seas, Philippines,' include Gonzalo Araujo, Sally Snow, the executive directors of the Large Marine Vertebrates Research Institute Philippines (Lamave) and Chris Rohner and Simon Pierce of the Marine Megafauna Foundation (MMF).
Overall, this title provides a useful and interesting source of information for readers aged 8 and up, who are fascinated with our long dead megafauna.
And there's a look at the megafauna of yesteryear, including the Titanoboa.
The spread of hominims - early humans and related species such as Neanderthals - from Africa thousands of years ago coincided with the extinction of megafauna such as the mammoth, the sabre-toothed tiger and the glyptodon, an armadillo-like creature the size of a car, according to the study.