caput medusae

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caput

 [kap´ut] (pl. cap´ita) (L.)
anatomical terminology for the expanded or chief extremity of an organ or part.
caput medu´sae the dilated cutaneous veins around the umbilicus, seen mainly in the newborn and in patients suffering from cirrhosis of the liver.
caput succeda´neum localized edema, congestion, and petechiae on the fetal and newborn scalp (presenting part), crossing the suture lines.

ca·put me·du·sae

1. varicose veins radiating from the umbilicus, seen in Cruveilhier-Baumgarten syndrome;
2. dilated ciliary arteries girdling the corneoscleral limbus in rubeosis iridis.
Synonym(s): Medusa head
[Medusa, G. myth. char.]
A term of art referring to the engorged veins that radiate from a recanalized umbilical vein—falciparum ligament in portal hypertension—which is most commonly seen in advanced cirrhosis, and is accompanied by ascites, hepatosplenomegaly, and patent hepatic veins

caput medusae

Medusa head Hepatology A term for the engorged veins that radiate from a recanalized umbilical vein–falciparum ligament in portal HTN, most common in advanced alcoholic cirrhosis, and accompanied by ascites, hepatosplenomegaly, patent hepatic veins

ca·put me·du·sae

(kap'ŭt me-dū'sē)
1. Varicose veins radiating from the umbilicus, seen in Cruveilhier-Baumgarten syndrome.
2. Dilated ciliary arteries girdling the corneoscleral limbus in rubeosis iridis.
Synonym(s): Medusa's head.
[Medusa, G. mythical character]

ca·put me·du·sae

(ka'put me-dū'sē)
1. Varicose veins radiating from the umbilicus.
2. Dilated ciliary arteries girdling the corneoscleral limbus in rubeosis iridis.
[Medusa, G. myth. char.]
Enlarge picture
CAPUT MEDUSAE: Prominent superficial abdominal veins seen on a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

caput medusae

A plexus of dilated veins around the umbilicus, seen in patients with portal hypertension (usually as a result of cirrhosis of the liver). It may be seen in newborns.
See: illustration
See also: caput

caput medusae

A conspicuous whorl of large veins sometimes seen radiating from the navel in CIRRHOSIS of the liver. This is an attempt to provide a shunt (collateral circulation) around obstructed liver veins. The Gorgon, Medusa, had snakes instead of hair, hence the name.

Medusa,

in Greek mythology, a Gorgon who turned men to stone.
caput Medusae - (1) varicose veins radiating from the umbilicus; - (2) dilated ciliary arteries girdling the corneoscleral limbus in rubeosis iridis. Synonym(s): head of Medusa
head of Medusa - Synonym(s): caput Medusae
References in periodicals archive ?
This is similar to what we witness in the Ovidian scene: military power (Phineus) confronts and loses to the power of art (Perseus with Medusa's head).
Freud's essay "Medusa's Head" affords us a glimpse of the "female horror," but what is most helpful in examining the elements of temporality and sequences is a lesser known essay "The Theme of the Three Caskets" published in 1913.
Point out that instead of hair, Medusa's head is covered with poisonous snakes.
(31) The Medusa's head is in this respect an emblem for the educator's control over the irrational and incomprehensible.
Freud argues that the Medusa's head may evoke castration anxiety in yet another way: as a symbol of female genitalia.
The view that the connotations of the Medusa image are purely negative is one that Freud also posits in his famous essay "Medusa's Head," where he underscores Medusa's power to induce horror in the male viewer and states that the head isolates "the horrifying effects" of the female genitalia from "their pleasure-giving ones." (3) Nevertheless, Freud's assertion would have come as a surprise to sixteenth-century readers, who were accustomed to an eroticized Medusa, a figure so prevalent in French and Italian love poetry that she had become a cliche of the genre.
Here's one with Medusa's head, cheek submerged in water.
Some interpretations are familiar, even canonical: John Freccero on Dante's Medusa ("Medusa: The Letter and the Spirit," 1972); Louis Marin on Caravaggio's self-portrait as Medusa (To Destroy Painting, 1977); and Neil Hertz on Medusa in the French Revolution ("Medusa's Head: Male Hysteria under Political Pressure," 1983).
Meyer show that all gradations are possible from the "writhing flames" of a coiffure, through a glimpse of Aissa's face ("the slender spikes of pale green orchids streamed from amongst the boughs and mingled with the black hair that framed her face"), to an explicit recoil in front of a character, "exactly as if she had seen Medusa's head with serpentine locks" (299).
(25) The eye drops down from Perseus's face to Medusa's head and from his scimitar to Medusa's headless torso.
Great Yarmouth Sea Life Centre has given its mighty ocean tank a major facelift and added a spectacular 10ft-high Medusa's head as a central feature.