medullary canal


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Related to medullary canal: endosteum, yellow marrow

canal

 [kah-nal´]
a relatively narrow tubular passage or channel.
adductor canal Hunter's canal.
Alcock's canal a tunnel formed by a splitting of the obturator fascia, which encloses the pudendal vessels and nerve.
alimentary canal see alimentary canal.
anal canal the terminal portion of the alimentary canal, from the rectum to the anus.
atrioventricular canal the common canal connecting the primordial atrium and ventricle; it sometimes persists as a congenital anomaly.
birth canal the canal through which the fetus passes in birth.
carotid canal one in the pars petrosa of the temporal bone, transmitting the internal carotid artery to the cranial cavity.
cervical canal the part of the uterine cavity lying within the cervix.
condylar canal an occasional opening in the condylar fossa for transmission of the transverse sinus; called also posterior condyloid foramen.
canal of Corti a space between the outer and inner rods of Corti.
femoral canal the cone-shaped medial part of the femoral sheath lateral to the base of Gimbernat's ligament.
haversian canal any of the anastomosing channels of the haversian system in compact bone, containing blood and lymph vessels, and nerves.
Hunter's canal a fascial tunnel in the middle third of the medial part of the thigh, containing the femoral vessels and saphenous nerve. Called also adductor canal.
hypoglossal canal an opening in the occipital bone, transmitting the hypoglossal nerve and a branch of the posterior meningeal artery; called also anterior condyloid foramen.
infraorbital canal a small canal running obliquely through the floor of the orbit, transmitting the infraorbital vessels and nerve.
inguinal canal the oblique passage in the lower anterior abdominal wall on either side, through which passes the round ligament of the uterus in the female, and the spermatic cord in the male.
medullary canal
optic canal a passage for the optic nerve and ophthalmic artery at the apex of the orbit; called also optic foramen.
pulp canal root canal.
root canal that part of the pulp cavity extending from the pulp chamber to the apical foramen. Called also pulp canal.
sacral canal the continuation of the spinal canal through the sacrum.
Schlemm's canal venous sinus of sclera.
semicircular c's see semicircular canals.
spinal canal (vertebral canal) the canal formed by the series of vertebral foramina together, enclosing the spinal cord and meninges.
Volkmann's c's canals communicating with the haversian canals, for passage of blood vessels through bone.

medullary canal

(1) Central canal of spinal cord; canalis centralis medullae spinalis [NA6].
(2) Neural canal; canalis neuralis [[NE3]].

medullary canal

The marrow cavity of long bones.
See also: canal
References in periodicals archive ?
This allows examining the complex geometry which may be difficult to carry out based on conventional twodimensional radiographic technique (Chantarapanich et al., 2011) Therefore, in human medical literature, three-dimensional measurement methods have been widely used for reliable measuring of head-neck position and medullary canal shape of femur regarding new designs of hip implants.
If the start point is too anterior, an anterior apex angulation forms and the distal fragment is displaced posteriorly.15 In this case, not only do the medial and lateral sides of the subtrochanteric area receive mechanical stress but also the anterior and posterior cortical bones are subjected to abnormal stress.12 Hence, the fixation ability of an IM nail is difficult to consider as sufficient by itself in the wide medullary canal.
Experience in total joint replacement with implantation of stems into the medullary canal shows that loosening of the prostheses remains a serious problem [8-10].
Entry of guide wire was made just medial to lateral intercondylar eminence tibia proximal to tibial tuberosity and in line of the medullary canal under fluoroscopy.
With the trocar, the reamed material in the sleeve is pushed into the medullary canal. The maximum size reamer which was used to ream the femoral canal before proximal entry reamer, is again inserted up to the fracture site to push the reamed material into the fracture site.
In addition, application of this instrument occupies a large space, influencing the optimal surgical incision, visualization of anatomic structures around fracture sites, and the placement of osteosynthesis plates or intramedullary nail (IMN) due to Schanz screws placed passing through the medullary canal. To address the above-mentioned technical limitations, various techniques and instruments for fracture reduction in a minimally invasive fashion have been introduced and applied in the clinical application.
The defect was created using an electric drill (Makita, Pet Medical, Brazil) with 4.5mm in diameter and depth enough to reach medullary canal. An intramedullary Steinnamn pin was repeatedly introduced and removed through the defect to detach bone marrow that was partly removed with a 14G catheter and a syringe.
Due to the possibility of tumor spread and the poor bone quality adjacent to pathological fractures, we did not perform any reaming of the medullary canal. This not only reduces the operative time, but also avoids thermal injury to the surrounding soft tissue.
The "AO" group recommends extracting the proximal fragment, followed by over-reaming of the medullary canal down to the distal nail fragment.
After locating the site of fracture, the proximal bone fragment was elevated and an intramedullary pin (3mm) which almost filled the diameter of medullary canal was inserted into the proximal fragment and pin was withdrawn through skin after making stab incision at the trochanteric fossa.
Enchondromas are hyaline cartilage tumors in the medullary canal. They typically are asymptomatic; however, lesions in the hands or feet may be painful.
The medullary canal was opened, drilled, and reamed, and the prosthesis was inserted to abut the distal cut bone surface (Fig 2).