biotechnology

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Related to medtech: Meditech

bi·o·tech·nol·og·y

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ō-jē),
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules, or for the alteration of biologic processes to enhance some desired property.

biotechnology

(bī′ō-tĕk-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The use of living organisms or biological processes for the purpose of developing useful agricultural, industrial, or medical products, especially by means of techniques, such as genetic engineering, that involve the modification of genes.
2. See ergonomics.

bi′o·tech′ni·cal (-nĭ-kəl) adj.
bi′o·tech′no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.

biotechnology

[-teknol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, bios + techne, art, logos, science
1 the study of the relationships between humans or other living organisms and machinery, such as the health effects of computer equipment on office workers or the ability of airplane pilots to perform tasks when traveling at supersonic speeds.
2 the industrial application of the results of biological research, particularly in fields such as recombinant deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) or gene splicing, which permits the production of synthetic hormones or enzymes by combining genetic material from different species. See also recombinant DNA.

biotechnology

Any technological application that uses biological systems, living organisms or derivatives thereof, to make or modify products or processes for specific use.

Biotech tools
Recombinant DNA, monoclonal antibody and bioprocessing techniques, cell fusion.
 
Biotech products
Antibiotics, insulin, interferons, recombinant DNA, and techniques (e.g., waste recycling).
 
Ancient forms of biotechnology
Production of bread, cheese, wine, beer.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
1. The field devoted to applying the techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings and the environment.
2. The use of recombinant DNA or hybridoma technologies for production of useful molecules.

biotechnology

The use of micro-organisms or biological processes for commercial, medical or social purposes. The earliest known examples of biotechnology are the fermentation of wines and the making of cheese.

biotechnology

the use of organisms, their parts or processes, for the manufacture or production of useful or commercial substances and for the provision of services such as waste treatment. The term denotes a wide range of processes, from the use of earthworms as a source of protein, to the genetic manipulation of bacteria to produce human gene products such as growth hormone.

bi·o·tech·nol·o·gy

(bī'ō-tek-nol'ŏ-jē)
Field devoted to applying techniques of biochemistry, cellular biology, biophysics, and molecular biology to addressing practical issues related to human beings, agriculture, and the environment.

biotechnology

the application for industrial purposes of scientific, biological principles. The most modern examples are the use of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering to manufacture a wide variety of biologically useful substances such as vaccines and hormones by expression of cloned genes in various host cell systems including bacteria, yeast and insect cells.
References in periodicals archive ?
John Babitt, EY Americas Medtech Leader, says, Growth-by-acquisition was the medtech industry's go-to-strategy over the last year and is likely to remain so as companies continue to focus on their strategic priorities.
As Pulse of the Industry documents, in 2015-16 there was greater evidence of medtechs aligning with non-traditional partners such as information technology companies and payers.
Customer needs drove MedTech to adopt other computerized manufacturing solutions as well.
MedTech uses it to track materials, inventory transfers, warehouse locations and shipping information--all but eliminating chances for human error, Richards says.
For the MRP software, MedTech initially looked at 50 suppliers, narrowing that number down to the five that went to the user group for final selection.
This whole selection process took over a year and a half, but it enabled MedTech to make the leap from a less-fully-used MRP package and some "islands" of individual machine automation to where it is today.
Indeed, MedTech has a conception of CIM as being compatible with continuous-improvement principles, so the door to future refinements had to be left open.
So-called open systems rely on common communication standards, which enabled MedTech to weave together the products of different vendors into an enterprise-wide system.
Far from being locked into the DEC VAX platform, for example, MedTech "could switch to another box tomorrow and we'd never need to know," he says.
The software and hardware "partners" eventually chosen by MedTech "stepped up to the plate" when MedTech needed features added to a package.
Richards notes that DTR's upgrade and an imminent move at MedTech to the TCP/IP protocol will allow an even "more seamless" integration of MedTech's EDI, bar-coding and machine-monitoring packages.
It would be easy, but wrong, to assume that all MedTech had to do after its exhaustive search is take the shrink wrap off its computer equipment, plug everything in, and start reaping the benefits.