meditate

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meditate

(mĕd′ĭ-tāt′)
v. medi·tated, medi·tating, medi·tates
v.intr.
1.
a. To train, calm, or empty the mind, often by achieving an altered state, as by focusing on a single object, especially as a form of religious practice in Buddhism or Hinduism.
b. To engage in focused thought on scriptural passages or on particular doctrines or mysteries of a religion, especially Christianity.
c. To engage in devotional contemplation, especially prayer.
2. To think or reflect, especially in a calm and deliberate manner.

med′i·ta′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another study demonstrated that meditation leads to less reliance on former knowledge by measuring degrees of mental rigidity and flexibility among mindfulness meditators. They explored this using the water jar paradigm, which is designed to "trap" participants by asking them questions regarding three hypothetical jars needed to fill a certain amount of liquid.
Neuroimaging and electroencephalographic studies have shown that the brain connectivity of meditators changes as they meditate [9, 15, 16] as well as in the resting state [17-19].
However, there has been increasing tension within the meditator community, as evidenced by the growing number of factions within that community.
The meditator has the choice, not only of developing either method according to one's capacities and preferences, but also to incorporate elements of both in the creation of a unique personal meditative blend.
The LKM involves quietly entering a state of consciousness in which the meditator follows a specific script to guide the focus of their thoughts.
The study is conducted on meditators who were practicing meditation for more than six months and nonmeditators who had never done any kind of meditation.
Speaker Francois Becker has been a meditator for 35 years who has a strong background in science and technology.
The difference is in the mindset of the meditator (Salzberg, 1995).
Tsongkhapa's discussion introduces two levels of control over the emotions: the relative self-control of the reader of Tsongkhapa who has a commitment to practice the meditations he presents (the "meditator") and the relative lack of self-control of the person who has harmed another (the "harmdoer").
Thus, in the First Meditation, Cunning argues, the meditator himself is utterly confused, but as the work proceeds, many of these confusions are laid to rest.
Just as Cushman encourages yogis to "just practice," so does Zen encourage the meditator to "just sit." Ideally, a Zen Buddhist does not sit at any particular time with a specific goal in mind.