meditate

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meditate

(mĕd′ĭ-tāt′)
v. medi·tated, medi·tating, medi·tates
v.intr.
1.
a. To train, calm, or empty the mind, often by achieving an altered state, as by focusing on a single object, especially as a form of religious practice in Buddhism or Hinduism.
b. To engage in focused thought on scriptural passages or on particular doctrines or mysteries of a religion, especially Christianity.
c. To engage in devotional contemplation, especially prayer.
2. To think or reflect, especially in a calm and deliberate manner.

med′i·ta′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rashness, the play several times reveals, ejects him from the mighty maze his meditativeness almost instantaneously builds around him.
There were German interpretations of the play that stressed robust alternative readings to 'ratiocinative meditativeness', but they did not overturn traditional readings.
Goethe's concept of late style is discussed in a monograph by Hans Joachim Schrimpf, who connects the `stufenweises Zurucktreten aus der Erscheinung' with phenomena of two general types: the biological and psychological events of the artist's aging; and a fundamentally mystical Weltanschauung, a spiritualization, a meditativeness and a tendency towards abstraction manifest in his artistic products.(31) The concept of Altersstil is rooted in Goethe's own philosophy of nature, according to which the concealed laws of ontology are manifest in the matured organism, just as a rose is the manifestation of the natural laws inherent in the seed from which it grows.
Vet the frantic (probably record-breaking) pace of the first and final movements (9:28, 9:46), offset by the inorganically ostentatious meditativeness of the Adagio (10:18, as against Spacek's 9:55), is merely a framework.