meditate

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meditate

(mĕd′ĭ-tāt′)
v. medi·tated, medi·tating, medi·tates
v.intr.
1.
a. To train, calm, or empty the mind, often by achieving an altered state, as by focusing on a single object, especially as a form of religious practice in Buddhism or Hinduism.
b. To engage in focused thought on scriptural passages or on particular doctrines or mysteries of a religion, especially Christianity.
c. To engage in devotional contemplation, especially prayer.
2. To think or reflect, especially in a calm and deliberate manner.

med′i·ta′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
As author Jhumpa Lahiri notes meditatively in the novel The Lowlands, "Language, identity, place, home: these are all of a piece - just different elements of belonging and not-belonging." But when did our ancestors first develop spoken language, what are the brain's "language centers," and how does multilingualism impact our mental processes?
Ted does not meditatively consider the haze and find it wondrous; instead he sees it as a pedestrian feature of the weather.
When openness (sunyata) is not meditatively fixated on and thus blocked, its nature spontaneously displays non-dualistic (ontological) intelligence.
The various documents of the Second Vatican Council encouraged all Christians as people of God to participate actively in the liturgical activities of the church, read meditatively the Word of God and be partners in the church's work of evangelization.
"I suspect" and "I think"--that the reader has the feeling he is sitting in an intimate seminar room with Jacobs as the scholar meditatively pontificates on works he has lovingly read and absorbed over years of careful scholarship.
Students will learn how to engage in emotion regulation more meditatively. They will practice the art of meditation, deep breathing and stretching.
Her writing is, as is typical of her nonfiction, "voraciously intelligent and meditatively faithful" (Chicago Tribune), and readers who are less familiar with the religious history that serves as her context may occasionally find themselves a bit lost.
Addressing a passing cricket, Ko avows, "I want to see, want to touch your name," while elsewhere gazing uncannily at the "strange man in the mirror." These poems stake out places at once familiar and meditatively defamiliarized, but this poet who claims to have been "born into this world innumerable times" also understands a phenomenological role for poetry, in which linguistic inventions can open new vistas where "Word was not word till now."
I think of the most impassioned communications--as crying fights blown out with fragmented abstractions of hurt and anger--mostly partial and repeated words and sentences--interrupting and unfinishing itself so one might be--inside a swim of words and sound--without comprehensively expressed thought--but meaning more full--and the other more pleasant passions act the same too--abstraction can be porous like that--that folding cavalcade of words--words with their images their thought and resonance--meant to allow an attentive drift almost meditatively forming--meaning temporarily held--
There will be a number who will be doing it by themselves, prayerfully and meditatively.
It thoughtfully, sometimes meditatively, examines human responses to catastrophic events from earthquakes to volcanic explosions, as well as differing perceptions of nature, risk, and how the world works.