medicolegal

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medicolegal

 [med″ĭ-ko-le´g'l]
pertaining to medicine and law, or to forensic medicine.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

med·i·co·le·gal

(med'i-kō-lē'găl),
Relating to both medicine and the law.
See also: forensic medicine.
[medico- + L. legalis, legal]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

medicolegal

(mĕd′ĭ-kō-lē′gəl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or concerned with both medicine and law, as when medical testing or examination is undertaken for a legal purpose.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

med·i·co·le·gal

(med'i-kō-lē'găl)
Relating to both medicine and the law.
See also: forensic medicine
[medico- + L. legalis, legal]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

medicolegal

Pertaining to both MEDICINE and law.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

med·i·co·le·gal

(med'i-kō-lē'găl)
Relating to both medicine and the law.
See also: forensic medicine
[medico- + L. legalis, legal]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Thomas should be commended on his eloquent letter summarising the state of play in this delicate and somewhat dangerous (both clinically and medicolegally) situation.
If the exam is sanctioned, a failure to take it would cast one as an outsider and medicolegally liable should an untoward event occur.
"Reliable, quantifiable, easily accessible information on the plaque also is of importance medicolegally," he added.
Rockwell said she had previously been a staunch advocate of routine use of chaperones, reasoning that if male physicians were protecting themselves medicolegally in this way, then female physicians also were entitled to such protection.
* Foster and communicate alternatives that contain cost, preserve quality, and are safe medicolegally. The provision of alternatives and education are the keys to riskfree economic credentialing.
With the FDA approval, use of these three agents is considered a standard of care and therefore medicolegally safe.
Ken Noller called such recommendations on cytology reports "medicolegally worrisome."