medicobiologic

(redirected from medicobiological)

med·i·co·bi·o·log·ic

, medicobiological (med'i-kō-bī'ō-loj'ik, -loj'i-kăl),
Pertaining to the biologic aspects of medicine.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

med·i·co·bi·o·log·ic

, medicobiological (medi-kō-bīŏ-lojik, -i-kăl)
Pertaining to the biologic aspects of medicine.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Dhanalekshmi, "Formulation and evaluation of nsaid-loaded tristearin solid lipid nanoparticles," International Journal of Medicobiological Research, vol.
Typical examples are the aromatic anthracycline antibiotics (daunomycin, doxorubicin, topotecan, mitoxantrone, etc.), which are effective against solid tumors and leukemia; quinolone antibiotics (norfloxacin, ofloxacin, etc.), exerting a wide spectrum of antibacterial activity; aromatic vitamins (riboflavin, nicotinamide, etc.), used as antioxidants in chemotherapy; methylxanthines which are present in high concentrations in food sources; and many other aromatic compounds, possessing useful medicobiological properties (Figure 1) [1,2].
However, the risk of side toxicity may be significantly lowered, or the medicobiological effect amplified, by combination of these antibiotics with other drugs, for instance, with various antitumour aromatic antibiotics (known as a combinational chemotherapy) or vitamins [4-6].
In general, the interconnection of medicobiological activity of aromatic drugs and their propensity to self-associate in solution appears to be specific to any drug.
Potentially, this effect can be used as a strategy of regulation of the medicobiological activity of aromatic drugs in clinical practice, say, for example, in the reduction of the consequences of drug overdosing during the chemotherapy or in the production of antimutagenic effects in vivo [37,53], regulate the rate of drug degradation [54, 55], and optimize the solubility of the drug [56].
As a result of previous investigations on the interaction of aromatic vitamin riboflavin, its analogue, flavinmononucleotide, and its derivatives, with other aromatic BACs in aqueous solution carried out by various experimental methods, several possible mechanisms of interaction of the molecules have been suggested, to explain the observed alteration of medicobiological action of aromatic BACs in the presence of the vitamin.
In the current scientific literatures there is no clear understanding of the mechanisms and reasons for the influence of the combination of aromatic antitumour drugs on the experimentally observed medicobiological effect as a result of their simultaneous administration.
An epidemiological link between the reduction of cardiovascular mortality and moderate wine consumption in French and Mediterranean adults, known as the "French paradox" [1], has attracted the steady interest of medicobiological researchers over the past two decades.
"Aronia melanocarpa fruits are one of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances, mainly anthocyanins," Stefka Valcheva-Kuzmanova, MD, PhD, chief assistant professor of medicobiological sciences at the Medical University in Varna, Bulgaria, told Life Extension.
When one considers what is on the near horizon in medicine in terms of unequal access to new kinds of prosthetic, transplant, genetic-selection, and longevity medical treatments, the prospect is for medicobiological elites and castes of a sort unimaginable even in the most archaic premodern societies.