medicine woman


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Related to medicine woman: medicine man

medicine woman

n.
A female shaman or shamanistic healer, especially among Native American peoples.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have the story of Medicine Woman in Canada as well," said Laronde.
Behn Smith makes it clear to her patients that she is not a traditional medicine woman, however, she is able to refer her patients to those that are.
This is a spell of unknown proportion whose words only the medicine woman can chant to bring the world to the normalcy of ecstasy; only she possesses the power to calm the waves, put out the voluptuous flames, bring to an end the civil war that ravages the entire polity, and make love a dividend of freedom fighters.
SOMETHING of a S pow-wow came to the West Midlands as Cree Indian Buffy brought her own style of medicine woman to Wolverhampton.
"Medicine Trails: A Life in Many Worlds" is a memoir of Mavis McConvey, a native American medicine woman in the Klamath River region of Northern California.
"Medicine Trails: A Life in Many Worlds" is the deeply moving biography of a modern medicine woman of the Karuk tribe of northern California.
Silko:Writing Storyteller and Medicine Woman by Brewster E.
Traditionally, the Bedouin medicine woman played an essential role in bringing rural communities together.
Marguerite La Flesche, Sacred White Buffalo, Mother Mary Catherine, and Ruby Modesto are names of women whose vocations ranged from educator or nun to medicine woman. All are welcome additions that add breadth and variety of cultures to this biographical collection.
In a well-illustrated text, Street (Chilliwack General Hospital, near Vancouver, BC, Canada) traces the history of medical devices from treatment by a medicine woman in Clan of the Cave Bear to the typical day, role, and training of biomedical engineering technologists in contemporary healthcare settings.
Cheechoo was overwhelmed to travel to places with Medicine Woman that she normally wouldn't have visited.
This story examines the effects of WW I on Xavier Bird, a one-legged, morphine-addicted Canadian Cree ex-soldier, as he is met at the train station by his only living relative, his Aunt Niska, a medicine woman who keeps to the old ways and lives in the forest.