medical waste incinerator


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medical waste incinerator

A device that eliminates the pathogenicity of medical waste by thermal decomposition (incineration) while markedly reducing its volume.

The ± 3700 MWIs in operation in US hospitals are required to meet strict EPA standards promulgated in the 2011 Federal Register.
References in periodicals archive ?
17) Final Medical Waste Incinerator Rule Faces Mid-1997 Deadline Under Settlement, Daily Env't Rep.
Since no one had studied whether the tiny amounts of dioxin, mercury, and other pollutants released from medical waste incinerators represent a truly significant health hazard, it was not clear that the new regulations would make a measurable difference in air quality.
1990), Operation and Maintenance of Hospital Medical Waste Incinerator, EPA/625/6-89/024, U.
Last year, the EPA proposed new standards for large municipal waste burners and this year the agency is setting its sights on medical waste incinerators.
5 million in bonds for a commercial medical waste incinerator.
environmentalists asked in April if the Ministry was concerned about the mounting scientific evidence identifying medical waste incinerators as among the largest sources of extremely toxic dioxin into the environment.
The problem is that Curtis Bay already hosts a 200-acre coal pier that produces black dust that collects on local streets and drifts inside windows, a fertilizer plant reeking of fresh manure, one of the nation's largest medical waste incinerators, chemical plants, fuel depots, and an open-air composting site.
Infectious agents can remain in the ash or be released from the stack of medical waste incinerators.
And the agency is not offering just words; it already has rescinded some of the more egregious loopholes on which the Bush administration misspent the taxpayers' resources, and it has taken new steps to control some of the worst toxic polluters, such as cement kilns and medical waste incinerators.
The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed tougher air pollution standards for medical waste incinerators, which environmental groups said have been among the country's worst emitters of mercury and dioxins.
Mercury is an environmental contaminant that originates from man-made sources, such as coal-burning power plants and medical waste incinerators, and then enters local waterways and hence into the ocean, where it accumulates in fatty fish.
However, since there are currently no medical waste incinerators in Colorado, non-hazardous drugs may be stabilized prior to landfill disposal.
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