medical social work


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medical social work

A branch of social work provided by social workers with an advanced degree, in a hospital, skilled nursing facility or hospice, to patients and their families in need of psychosocial assistance.

Medical social work interventions
Linking patients and families to resources and support in the community; co-ordinating psychotherapy, psychosocial assistance or grief counselling; helping patients expand their social support.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(13.) O'Brien and Turner, Establishing Medical Social Work.
The approved visits thus represented approximately two-thirds of the pllaned visits (64.4 percent), with more variation among the skilled therapies that are used least frequently (occupational therapy and medical social work services had approximately an 80-percent ratio of approved-to-planned visits, and speech therapy has a 54-percent ratio of approved-to-planned visits).
The challenges facing medical social work can be differentiated into three areas: the work environment, the traditional branding of the social work profession, and a resistance toward change.
Social work with the client population of people with serious mental illnesses that existed within the domain of organized, public mental health care came to be "in," one of several crucial professional boundary expansions at that time, including in child welfare and medical social work.
The vision for the journal was that it be built on the heritage of two other social work health journals, Medical Social Work and the Journal of Psychiatric Social Work (Mahaffey, 1976).
Respondents had been practicing medical social work for an average of 14 years and had been employed at their current facility for an average of 10 years.
Those familiar with medical social work realize practitioners are often faced with doing quick assessments, counseling, and crisis intervention, but also know these interventions take critical assessment and intervention skills that maintain respect for the person-in-environment perspective.
Richard Cabot, a prominent physician and educator who recognized the interdependence of medicine and social factors in promoting normal physical welfare, was a key player in the development of medical social work (Cabot, 1919).
Advocating for social justice in policies, formulation of policies, facilitation of discussion of old and new policies, and education of staff regarding new policies all received a greater level of participation by social workers who had been in hospice social work or in medical social work and had longer agency retention.
Looking back over a five-year period at the restructuring in hospital social work departments, Globerman, McDonald, and White help document the disappearance of medical social work (the very specialty that founded this journal) at the end of the 20th century.
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