medical rationing

medical rationing

The allocation of scarce or inadequate medical resources to an ever-expanding and increasingly-demanding population of patients. The avoidance of rationing (in the sense of denying essential treatment to a proportion of patients) is currently a major preoccupation of the medical profession and has led to healthy expansion in the used of specialist nurses, nurse practitioners, nurse prescribing, TELEMEDICINE and the increasing of the clinical scope of paramedical personnel of all kinds. In a tax-funded health system, in a context of ever-increasing treatment modalities, some form of rationing is inevitable. In Britain, this unpopular and thankless duty falls to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE).
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References in periodicals archive ?
From medical rationing to the use of human resources for AIDS care and treatment in Africa: a case for task shifting.
Can we also expect medical rationing to be dressed up as "choice" if we legalise assisted suicide in England?
Access to critical care: medical rationing of a public right or privilege?
A particularly brutal kind of medical rationing is coming to Oregon.
The author shares with readers his knowledge of water rationing in India, bread rationing in Egypt and medical rationing in England.
We want unbounded medical progress, an all-out war on death, lower taxes, and no medical rationing. It is a mix that cannot long be sustained but, like a drug-resistant virus, it continues mutating to keep us sick.
These stories and many others are what Browning says drives him to educate the American people "that government-run health care means high taxes, medical rationing and waiting lists to see specialists, get diagnostic tests, and to receive surgery."
The proposed "Patients' Bill of Rights" has nothing remotely to do with extending basic traditional rights of citizenship to Americans or with providing protections against medical rationing to patients.
"A lot of people are going to be very surprised and I think they will be very distressed at the idea of medical rationing by age."
A recent press release from the Medical Group Management Association asserts that medical rationing is here, to stay, so we had better get used to it.
"Can Medical Rationing Be Made Rational?" Archives of Internal Medicine 152(3): 476-7, March 1992.
Medical rationing can be defined as explicit or implicit policies or practices that balance medical supply and demand by causing some patients to forgo medically beneficial treatment within a system of health care provision that is collectively financed (through insurance, taxes, or aid).

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