medical paternalism

medical paternalism

A philosophy that certain health decisions (e.g., whether to undergo heroic surgery, appropriateness of care in terminally ill patients) are best left in the hands of those providing healthcare.

medical paternalism

Medical ethics A philosophy that certain health decisions–eg, whether to undergo heroic surgery, appropriateness of care in terminally ill Pts, are best left in the hands of those providing health care. See Arato v Avedon. Cf Informed consent.
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Having not trained in an era steeped in medical paternalism, younger physicians are more likely to place the patient on the pedestal rather than themselves.
Keywords: Confidentiality, Informed consent, Medical paternalism, Patient rights.
For example, medical paternalism, the base of the Hippocratic Oath, was replaced by the patients' rights, invoking the moral and legal autonomy of them, forcing the physician to consider as prima facie duties, in addition to the autonomy duty, the beneficence and non-maleficence ones.
Now many of them strongly argue that medical paternalism is justified when people doctors deem to have a poor quality of life dare to consider their own lives worth living and seek life-saving medical treatment, food, and fluids.
This shift, towards a greater focus on patients' rights and the questioning of medical authority, went hand in hand with greater emphasis on patient autonomy and resistance to medical paternalism.
Jane Wilson's chapter focuses on medical paternalism and attempts to come to grips with a non-reductive justification of paternalism.
The first is the "regime of medicalization" described by Talcott Parsons' sick role, reinforcing medical paternalism and monopoly of knowledge (such as there was to monopolize).
The reasonable patient standard is based on a fallacy of medical paternalism, is tainted by hindsight bias, and causes physicians to respond negatively in a manner that harms patients.
He also discusses informed consent, medical paternalism, and creating an ethical culture in research.
Medical science says 'no' right now, but there are other sciences and other beliefs, so it is up to individuals to decide whether recommending cord collection is medical paternalism or the way of the future.
A quick look at the history of the FDA's regulation of pharmaceutical advertising reveals the rise of a system steeped in conflict of interest under the guise of medical paternalism.

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