medical outcomes study


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Medical Outcomes Study

A two-year study of patients with chronic conditions, which was designed to:
(1) Determine whether variations in patient outcomes are explained by differences in system of care, clinician specialty, and clinicians' technical and interpersonal styles; and
(2) Develop more practical tools for the routine monitoring of patient outcomes in medical practice. 

The 116-item MOS core survey measures of quality of life include physical, mental and general health. It was later divided into the SF-36 and SF-12 questionnaires.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

medical outcomes study

,

MOS

A Study to provide valid comparisons between medical care processes and outcomes as they are affected by system of care and clinician's specialty, as well as by patients' diagnoses and the levels of severity of illness. MOS provides a model for monitoring the results of medical care.
See: medical audit
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Antecedents of adherence to medical recommendations: Results from the Medical Outcomes Study. J Behav Med.
"The Use of Standardized Measures of Functional Status and Well-being Among Cognitively Impaired and Intact Elders: Results from the Medical Outcomes Study." Presented at the 43rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America, Boston.
Missing data were common in our study and considerably higher than in the Medical Outcomes Study, where missing value rates for the 36 items in a general population were low, averaging just 3.9% (range 1.1-5.9%) [8].
Patients who were eligible for inclusion in the MOS baseline panel completed questionnaires addressing general health status (the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]), alcohol use, exercise, and sleep.
Questions in the survey have their origins in the Medical Outcomes Study, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Survey (CDCBRFSS), the Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS), and the Group Health Association of America's Consumer Satisfaction Survey.
The Medical Outcomes Study has found that specialists use more resources than generalists do and general internists use more than family physicians, controlling for case mix.
Rural survivors fared worse on every mental health outcome variable that was measured by the university researchers, including subscales of the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS-36), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Thermometer Rating and Problem List.
The questionnaires included the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index.
The questionnaires used included the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (General and Prostate Specific), the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), and the American Urological Association Symptom Index.
Quality of life as assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study short form (SF-36) was slightly but significantly worse in patients who received letrozole.
* OUTCOMES MEASURED The primary outcome was change in the Mental Component Score (MCS) of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36).
These include the RAND Health Insurance Study (HIS) and the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS), both of great significance in understanding issues of access to medical care among different systems of care (Manning et al.

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