medical harm

medical harm

Uninintended physical injury resulting from or contributed to by medical care (including the absence of indicated medical treatment), which requires additional monitoring, treatment or hospitalisation, or results in death. Such injury is considered harm whether or not it is considered preventable, whether or not it resulted from a medical error, and whether or not it occurred within a hospital. Medical harm does not imply intent or negligence, nor does it indicate severity of the harm. According to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI), 15 million instances of medical harm occur per year in the USA.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In an accompanying editorial, experts at the London School of Economics and Harvard Medical School said the study "serves as a reminder of the extent to which medical harm is prevalent across health systems, and, importantly, draws attention to how much is potentially preventable."
Hospitals that earn an 'A' grade are making it a priority to protect patients from preventable medical harm and error.
"If you're going to introduce something that creates medical harm the standard of evidence must be better than what exists here.
We accounted for inconsistent reporting of POA indicators in SID data by dropping patients whose POA indicator was missing or invalid for a relevant diagnosis code needed to develop the medical harm indicator.
Beyond the statistics is a poignant, underlying fact - despite medical breakthroughs and advances in medical technology, heartrending stories caused by medical harm continue to persist.
David Mayer, Vice President of Quality and Safety for MedStar Health, said: "Patient safety and preventable medical harm are global issues.
The program also addressed a very important subject of 'event reporting' so that institutions can learn from medical errors in order to implement change that ultimately improves patient safety in the healthcare systems." David Mayer, Vice President of Quality and Safety for MedStar Health, said: "Patient safety and preventable medical harm are global issues.
Feltner and her colleagues concluded that current serologic screening tests produce a high rate of false-positive results--as much as 50%--and that those in turn lead to psychosocial harms such as distress and disruption of personal relationships, as well as increased costs and potential medical harm associated with confirmatory testing and unnecessary treatment.
While fasting is said to provide spiritual upliftment and emotional wellbeing to the devout,5 this must be weighed against possible medical harm. Keeping this in mind, a person-centered approach to Ramadan fasting is suggested in persons with diabetes.6 Decisions regarding whether to fast or not, and what medication to take, must be made through a process of informed, and shared, decision making.7 No data exists, however, to help predict and quantify the potential spiritual benefits of fasting and weigh them against possible biomedical risks.
There is now awareness of the problem of medical harm and a determination to handle it2.
Recent Medicare data reveal more than 200,000 patients per year die as a result of avoidable medical harm, and one in three patients admitted to U.S.