medical abuse

The use of excessive life support or resuscitative measures for a terminally ill patient
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

medical abuse

Medical ethics The use of excessive life support or resuscitative measures for a terminally ill Pt. See End-of-life debate. Cf Abuse.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They address radiology, head trauma, nonfatal strangulation, bruises and burns, ophthalmic manifestations and oral injuries, thoracoabdominal injuries, poisoning, neglect, abandonment, failure to thrive, sexual abuse, sexually transmitted diseases, pregnancy, medical abuse, the role of law enforcement, interdisciplinary death investigation, DNA, and prevention.
Death is just a footnote in a long history of medical abuse," said MacKay, "That's 'business as usual' for many in this profession." MacKay was standing near an exhibit vignette titled Psychiatric Criminality which notes "psychiatrists and psychologists have an inordinately high number of criminal convictions as compared to other sectors of the health care profession."
Many talked about jail, prison, and law enforcement medical abuse and neglect; coerced suicide; torture such as solitary confinement, the torture/restraint chair, and stress position cage; racial profiling; and the way jails and prisons destroy individuals and families.
WORLD WITHOUT END Channel 4, 9pm Executions, medical abuse and a topdrawer cast to boot; there are plenty of reasons to stay in of a Saturday night if you stick with Channel 4.
Executions, medical abuse and a top-drawer cast make this telly to stay in for.
demonstrate a pattern of conduct of medical abuse and to show the
They are also not detectives; they do not have investigatory or protective powers, except in very extreme cases of direct observation of medical abuse and neglect.
Curbing the potential for medical abuse, though, is a matter of public concern.
The center is charged with ensuring that the donor and recipient are mentally healthy and preventing economic and medical abuse of the donor.
To remove physical punishment without supportive universal services could potentially result in risk being transferred from physical to medical abuse.
Though subjects in these studies theoretically have redress through state tort laws, proving medical abuse is difficult.
Robertson, "The Morphine Habit: Its Causation, Treatment, and Possibility of its Cure," Pacific Medical Journal 40 (May 1897): 270; and "The Medical Abuse of Opium," Medical Age 12 (October 25, 1894): 631.
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