mediator

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me·di·a·tor

(mē'dē-ā'tŏr, -tōr),
An intermediary substance or thing; a substance released from cells that regulates or causes physiologic consequences.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mediator

(mē′dē-ā′tər)
n.
1. One that mediates, especially one that reconciles differences between disputants.
2. Physiology A substance or structure that mediates a specific response in a bodily tissue.
3. Physics A subatomic particle that effects or conveys a force between subatomic particles.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

mediator

A thing or agent that carries out a process or reaction.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mediator

(mē′dē-ā″tŏr)
1. Any substance or anatomical structure that transmits information between two reagents, cells, tissues, or organs.
2. Neutral third party who facilitates agreements by helping disputing parties to identify their needs and work toward mutually agreeable solutions.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Ekmekji joins Justine Abi Saad at the German development agency GIZ, as the only mediators for Lebanon.
'There would be proper training of the mediator on how to deal with the issues,' the law said.
Sometimes, attorneys also work as mediators outside of their law practices.
Under Section 59/A ( 2 ) of Civil Procedure Act, the MAC is mandated to enforce a code of ethics for the mediators to ensure that mediators conduct themselves in a manner that engenders public trust.
Each party shall furnish to the mediator or conciliator the information as required by him in connection with the concerned issues.
Mediators will turn 30 in 2018 and is an affiliate of Burson-Marsteller.
Even more fraudulent in this process is that IGAD mediators went out of their ways and audaciously invented fake opposition groups.
Section member and certified mediator Karen Evans of Miami said mandating certification would be an affront to "party self-determination," and "some of the best mediators around" are not certified.
The data clearly demonstrates that exposure to peer mediation reduces personal conflict, especially for peer mediators; these impacts are significant, cumulative, and sustained for long periods (Jones 2004).
The mediator's dilemma arises primarily from Florida Rule for Certified and Court-Appointed Mediators 10.300, which indicates 1) the purpose of mediation is to provide a forum for consensual dispute resolution by the parties, and 2) the mediator must honor the parties' right of self-determination, must act with impartiality, must preserve confidentiality, and avoid improper influence or coercion.
Equally, what constitutes ethical practice for mediators is a vexing question.
For 20 years, I have served as an impartial mediator in hundreds of disputes (most arise in personal injury, civil rights, breach of contract and employment cases).