mediate

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me·di·ate

(mē'dē-āt),
1. Situated between; intermediate.
2. To effect something by means of an intermediary substance, as in complement-mediated phagocytosis.
[L. mediatus, fr. medio, pp. -atus, to divide in the middle]

mediate

/me·di·ate/ (me´de-it) indirect; accomplished by means of an intervening medium.

mediate

/me·di·ate/ (me´de-āt) to serve as an intermediate agent.

mediate

[mē′dē·āt]
Etymology: L, medio, in the middle
1 v, to cause a change, as in stimulation by a hormone.
2 v, to settle a dispute, as in collective bargaining.
3 adj, situated between two places, things, parts, or terms.
4 n, (in psychology) an event that follows one process or event and precedes another; for example, in the process of cognition, perception follows stimulation and precedes thinking. mediating, adj., mediator, n.

mediate

verb
(1) To act as the agent for a process.
(2) To intervene on behalf of another.

me·di·ate

(mēdē-ăt, -āt)
1. Situated between; intermediate.
2. To effect something by means of an intermediary substance, as in complement-mediated phagocytosis.
[L. mediatus, fr. medio, pp. -atus, to divide in the middle]
References in periodicals archive ?
He writes, for example, that "the church is the kingdom of heaven" and that Christ's redemptive, mediatorial kingship is "terminated specially on the church.
But in so far as the said love is mutual, it is objectivized and therefore personal, distinct from the Father and the Son, its originators, and existing between them as their bond and thus allowing to the Holy Spirit an active, mediatorial role reflected in the economy but not envisaged in the earlier model.
48) Calvin's aversion to the mediatorial role of the mother of God was easily translated into a popular idiom and could be simply stated: devotion to Mary is blasphemous and must be abolished.
They too give a mediatorial role not only to Christ but also the martyrs in their calendar, and they also invoke angels.
By such an insistence neither Mary herself, nor her participation in Christ's mediatorial role is diminished.
9) Concerning the second, the development of Christology and the existence of exalted mediatorial figures in the heavenly world has been the subject of fierce debate: was early Christianity merely taking over a theology in which the existence of divine beings wielding divine authority was part of the fabric of Jewish belief?
Or should we deny any mediatorial role, as some elements of the Reformation were eventually to do?