mediastinitis


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Related to mediastinitis: Fibrosing Mediastinitis

mediastinitis

 [me″de-as″tĭ-ni´tis]
inflammation of the mediastinum.
fibrosing mediastinitis (fibrous mediastinitis) mediastinal fibrosis.

me·di·as·ti·ni·tis

(mē'dē-as'ti-nī'tis),
Inflammation of the cellular tissue of the mediastinum.

mediastinitis

/me·di·as·ti·ni·tis/ (-as″tĭ-ni´tis) inflammation of the mediastinum.
fibrosing mediastinitis , fibrous mediastinitis mediastinal fibrosis.

mediastinitis

an inflammation of the mediastinum.

mediastinitis

Inflammation of the mediastinum.

Acute mediastinitis
A fulminant infectious process with a high morbidity and mortality, in which organisms rapidly spread through areolar planes of mediastinum.
 
Aetiology
Traumatic oesophageal perforation, foreign bodies, suture line leakage, post-emetic rupture.
 
Clinical
Chest pain, dysphagia, respiratory distress, cervical-upper thoracic subcutaneous crepitus.
 
Imaging
By chest X-ray (CXR); may be normal early, followed by evidence of mediastinal and subcutaneous air.
 
Management
Aggressive and early with antibiotics; fluid resuscitation; chest tubes for pneumothorax or effusions; thoracotomy and surgical repair.
 
Chronic mediastinitis
A relatively indolent process characterised by chronic (“round cell”) inflammation and fibrosis.
 
Aetiology
Most often the result of a granulomatous process (e.g., TB, histoplasmosis) but may be idiopathic, as in sclerosing mediastinitis.
 
Clinical
Often silent if no oesophageal obstruction occurs.
 
Imaging
CXR; may be normal or mediastinum widened.
 
Management
Thoracotomy to confirm diagnosis or relieve obstruction.

mediastinitis

Surgery Inflammation of the mediastinum. See Mediastinoscopy, Mediastinum.
Mediastinitis
Acute mediastinitis A fulminant infectious process with a high M&M, in which organisms rapidly spread through areolar planes of mediastinum Etiology Traumatic esophageal perforation, foreign bodies, suture line leakage, post-emetic rupture Clinical Chest pain, dysphagia, respiratory distress, cervical-upper thoracic subcutaneous crepitus CXR May be normal early, followed by evidence of mediastinal and subcutaneous air Management Aggressive and early with antibiotics, fluid resuscitation, chest tubes for pneumothorax or effusions, thoracotomy and surgical repair
Chronic mediastinitis A relatively indolent process characterized by chronic–'round cell' inflammation and fibrosis Etiology Most often the result of a granulomatous process, eg TB, histoplasmosis, but may be idiopathic, as in sclerosing mediastinitis Clinical Often silent if no esophageal obstruction occurs CXR May be normal or mediastinum widened Management Thoracotomy to confirm diagnosis or relieve obstruction  

me·di·as·ti·ni·tis

(mē'dē-as'ti-nī'tis)
Inflammation of the cellular tissue of the mediastinum.

mediastinitis

Inflammation of the MEDIASTINUM.

me·di·as·ti·ni·tis

(mē'dē-as'ti-nī'tis)
Inflammation of the cellular tissue of the mediastinum.

mediastinitis

inflammation of the mediastinum.
References in periodicals archive ?
A rare complication is aortic pseudoaneurysm secondary to mediastinitis, which can have catastrophic consequences.
Other benign processes such as central venous catheter and fibrosing mediastinitis can cause SVC obstruction.
Wong, "Late presentation of poststernotomy mediastinitis 15 years after coronary artery bypass grafting," Annals of Thoracic Surgery, vol.
Cervicofacial and mediastinal emphysema following the use of dry air spray during dental procedures are rare complications and can result in deep neck infections or mediastinitis causing severe mortality and morbidity (1-4).
4 Others: tumour obstruction, fibrosing mediastinitis, chronic renal failure, segmental pulmonary hypertension
The differential diagnosis for pneumomediastinum includes pericarditis, mediastinitis, Boerhaave syndrome, and acute coronary syndrome.
Systemic complications include (a) deep neck space infections; (b) septic arthritis/osteomyelitis of the humerus, hip, clavicle, tibia, and fibula; (c) brain manifestations to include meningitis, epidural/subdural abscess, sinus thrombosis, and stroke; (d) lung manifestations to include mediastinitis, pulmonary embolism, empyema, hydrothorax/pneumothorax, and pneumonia; (e) eye manifestations to include uveitis, vitreous hemorrhage, retrobulbar mass, and cranial nerve VI palsy; (f) liver/spleen infarct or abscess; and (g) lower cranial nerve, XI-XII, palsies (Karkos et al.
10,11) Generalmente se opta por el tratamiento quirurgico en todos los pacientes con lesiones esofagicas asociadas, heridas traqueales abiertas, aumento progresivo del enfisema mediastinico o subcutaneo, mediastinitis o coleccion mediastinica sospechosa, dificultades en la ventilacion mecanica, sepsis o sindrome de distres respiratorio agudo.
Generalmente se presenta como un cuadro de neumonia aguda, cavidad pulmonar cronica, nodulos pulmonares, mediastinitis granulomatosa y fibrosis mediastinal (2,5).
4 Other: hrmoral obstruction, fibrosing mediastinitis, CRF, segmental PH Table 2: Current Histopathologic Classification Scheme for Plexogenic Arteriopathy (PA) in Pulmonary Hypertension (PH) [adapted from Katzenstein et al.
6 Facial palsy salivary fistula mediastinitis extension to the external auditory canal and abscess are common complications.
3,6-9) Complete mucosal healing and an uneventful recovery is the general rule, but can rarely be complicated with esophageal perforation, mediastinitis and esophageal stricture.