mediastinal


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mediastinal

 [me″de-as-ti´n´l]
of or pertaining to the mediastinum.
mediastinal flutter movement of the tissues and organs of the mediastinum back and forth with each movement of air into and out of an open sucking wound in the thoracic cavity. The condition can produce serious impairment of cardiopulmonary function and is fatal if not treated promptly. Symptoms are similar to those of mediastinal shift.
mediastinal shift a shifting or moving of the tissues and organs that comprise the mediastinum (heart, great vessels, trachea, and esophagus) to one side of the chest cavity. The condition occurs when a severe injury to the chest causes the entrapment of air in the pleural space (tension pneumothorax). As the volume of air increases on the affected side, the lung collapses and the organs and tissues of the mediastinum are crowded to the opposite side of the chest. This can produce compression of the other lung and kinking or twisting of one or more of the great blood vessels, which in turn seriously impairs blood flow to and from the heart.

Symptoms of mediastinal shift include severe dyspnea, cyanosis, displacement of the trachea to one side, and distended neck veins. The immediate treatment is insertion of a hollow needle or trocar into the pleural space (thoracentesis) to provide an outlet for the escape of air and fluid. After the trapped air is released, closed chest drainage is initiated to allow for reexpansion of the lung.
Mediastinal shift. As air from a pneumothorax is drawn into the chest cavity, it places pressure on the trachea, heart, and great vessels, causing them to shift from their normal anatomic positions. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·di·as·ti·nal

(mē'dē-as-tī'năl),
Relating to the mediastinum.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

mediastinal

adjective Referring to the mediastinum.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

me·di·as·ti·nal

(mē'dē-ă-stī'năl)
Relating to the mediastinum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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The X-rays showed a soft tissue density mass, causing anterior mediastinal widening along with cervical extension (Figure-1).
A total number constituted of about 43 mediastinal lesions and samples were obtained by either FNA or FNB wherever possible.
Based on the results herein, we recommend that the target area of T1-T2 mid-thoracic ESCC radiotherapy only includes lymph node drainage area in the mediastinal region, and that of the lower-thoracic region includes only the mediastinal and abdominal lymphatic drainage regions; while T3-T4 mid-thoracic ESCC target areas include lymph node drainage areas in the mediastinal and abdominal regions, and those in the lower-thoracic region includes the lymph node drainage areas in the mediastinum, lower mediastinum and abdominal area.
Therefore, the aim of our study was to plan a retrospective analysis of EBUS-TBNA in a real.life setting in patients whom were referred with suspected mediastinal lesions to a Chest Diseases Hospital containing an EBUS-TBNA center between December 1, 2012, and January 1, 2016.
We report a rare case of CAF with a giant saccular aneurysm misdiagnosed as a mediastinal mass due to its huge size.
The team proposed to perform thoracic resection of the MIBI-positive mediastinal solitary nodule using a robotic assisted approach.
The EBUS-TBNA has gained wide spread recognition as an accurate and minimally invasive technique for the evaluation of lymph nodes in patients with lung cancer (diagnosis/staging), mediastinal tumors and diagnosis of benign granulomatous lesions3-4.
Computed tomography (CT) of the thorax shows a large anterior mediastinal mass measuring 5.6cm x 10.7cm x 9.5cm causing compression to the pulmonary trunk and left atrium (Figure 2 a-c).
Chest x-rays may be normal or demonstrate subtle mediastinal widening.
Thoracoscopic drainage of and foreign body removal from a posterior mediastinal abscess.
The origin of mediastinal Mullerian cysts has yet to be firmly described.
The cervical approach will enable the resection of lesions in the neck and upper mediastinum, whereas large mediastinal lesions and lower or posterior mediastinal lesions will require thoracotomy, median sternotomy, or thoracoscopy.