mechanoreceptor


Also found in: Dictionary, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to mechanoreceptor: chemoreceptor, thermoreceptor

mechanoreceptor

 [mek″ah-no-re-sep´ter]
a nerve ending sensitive to mechanical pressures or distortions, as those responding to touch and muscle contractions.

mech·a·no·re·cep·tor

(mek'ă-nō-rē-sep'tŏr),
A receptor that responds to mechanical pressure or distortion; for example, receptors in the carotid sinuses, touch receptors in the skin.
Synonym(s): mechanicoreceptor

mechanoreceptor

/mech·a·no·re·cep·tor/ (mek″ah-no-re-sep´ter) a receptor that is excited by mechanical pressures or distortions, as those responding to touch and muscular contractions.

mechanoreceptor

(mĕk′ə-nō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A specialized sensory end organ that responds to mechanical stimuli such as tension, pressure, or displacement.

mech′a·no·re·cep′tion n.
mech′a·no·re·cep′tive adj.

mechanoreceptor

[mek′ənō′risep′tər]
Etymology: Gk, mechane, machine; L, recipere, to receive
any sensory nerve ending that responds to mechanical stimuli, such as touch, pressure, sound, and muscular contractions. See also proprioceptor.

mechanoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds to a mechanical stimulus (e.g., pressure or distortion).
 
Examples
Meissner's corpuscles, Merkel's discs, Pacinian corpuscles, Ruffini endings.

mech·a·no·re·cep·tor

(mekă-nō-rĕ-septŏr)
A receptor that responds to mechanical pressure or distortion; e.g., receptors in the carotid sinuses, touch receptors in the skin.

mechanoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds preferentially to physical deformation such as stretching, twisting, compressing or bending.

mechanoreceptor

a sensory structure that receives mechanical stimuli such as sound, pressure, movement, etc. See, for example, PROPRIOCEPTOR.

mechanoreceptor (mi·kanˈ·ō·ri·sepˑ·tr),

n a sense receptor activated by mechanical pressure (e.g., touch, massage) or distortion (e.g., muscle tension).

mech·a·no·re·cep·tor

(mekă-nō-rĕ-septŏr)
Receptor that responds to mechanical pressure, e.g., receptors in the carotid sinuses.

mechanoreceptor,

n a sensory nerve ending that responds to mechanical stimuli, such as touch, pressure, sound, and muscular contraction.

mechanoreceptor

a nerve-ending sensitive to mechanical pressures or distortions, such as those responding to touch and muscle contractions.

cutaneous mechanoreceptor
touch, pain, temperature, pressure receptors are defined in human skin; also some touch sensors which are stimulated only by firm pressure over a long period.
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been reported that the disruption of knee extension is observed in both ACL-injured and contralateral limbs of patients having ACL injury and is suggested to be attributed to the lack of afferent feedback from mechanoreceptors through the [gamma] loop (Konishi et al.
1997, 1998, 1999), it means possible that Sg are candidate mechanoreceptors.
Exercises utilizing large ranges of motion and requiring fast, forceful contractions lead to increased mechanoreceptor input and changes in the ANS.
I don't know of any case where any receptor can modulate the response frequency of a mechanoreceptor," Hessinger says, noting that similar sensory hairs, such as those in the human ear, have fixed lengths and respond to fixed frequencies.
21) who showed that chemical cardiopulmonary blockade by 5-HT3 receptors did not influence responses to cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptor stimulation.
Structure-function correlations of rat Sotatsu TONOMURA, Satomi trigeminal primary neurons: Emphasis on EBARA, Knarik BAGDASARIAN, club-like endings, a vibrissal Daisuke UTA, Ehud AHISSAR, mechanoreceptor Inbal Meir, Ilan LAMPL, Daichi KURODA, Takahiro FURUTA, Hidemasa FURUE and Kenzo KUMAMOTO Communicated by Kunihiko SUZUKI, M.
Several investigators already showed increased muscle activity following joint afferent fiber or mechanoreceptor stimulation and activation of gamma motor neurons (42,43).
21) Pain from an elongated styloid process is due to "constant mechanoreceptor discharge in the area of the 5th, 7th, 9th and 10th cranial nerve endings" initiated by a mechanical irritation from the styloid process.
Another theory suggests that the tension KT stimulates afferent mechanoreceptor output to the central nervous system which may dampen down nociceptive input (i.
Feedback stimulation is the body's response to mechanoreceptor detection of changes in the external environment whereas feedforward stimulation is the response to anticipation of center of mass changes necessary to perform or respond to upcoming feedback stimulation (8, 9).