mechanical restraint


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mechanical restraint

Any restrictive device (e.g., seatbelt, straitjacket (camisole), vest, or physical confinement) used to restrict a person’s free movement, most commonly in emergency situations.

Indications
Unsteadiness, wandering, disruptive behaviour, often secondary to psychiatric conditions and/or dementia; patients may also require pharmacologic restraints.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

mechanical restraint

Physical restaint A device used on a person to restrict free movement–eg, seatbelt, straitjacket–camisole, vest, or physical confinement Indications Unsteadiness, wandering, disruptive behavior, often 2º to psychiatric conditions and/or dementia; Pts may also require pharmacologic restraints. See Restraint, Pharmacologic restraint.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

mechanical restraint

Restraint by physical devices.
See also: restraint
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
However, they also recognized the need to adjust any safety-related design solutions they saw during these visits to accommodate their treatment philosophy because many of these facilities used mechanical restraints.
Hosted by Dr Mohamed Waqar Azeem, inaugural chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Sidra Medical and Research Center and Weill Cornell Medicine - Qatar, the WISH webinar highlighted how physical and mechanical restraints and seclusions are used in child and adolescent psychiatric treatment venues as a means of managing aggressive and self-harming behaviour.
All residential correctional programs under the jurisdiction of FDJJ are required to report incidents involving the use of physical and mechanical restraints.
Under the legislation, called the Keeping All Students Safe Act, children could not be secluded in locked or unattended areas and educators would be barred from using chemical or mechanical restraints, according to Disability Scoop.
One of the most useful pieces of data we developed established that on average, our well-trained staff incurred injuries severe enough to require medical treatment in 1 of every 4 instances of applying mechanical restraints. All staff could appreciate that as restraint usage was reduced, the number of associated staff injuries also would fall.
HB 2939 would prohibit mechanical restraints, which involves strapping or shackling a child to an inanimate object or wheelchair; chemical restraints, defined as using medications or drugs to modify a child's behavior; and prone restraints, where a child is held face-down on the ground.
Burrowes should have ordered that Martha be placed in mechanical restraints. He further contended that Dr.
However, self-mutilating behaviour and persistent violent physical struggling against mechanical restraints with the risk of exhaustion may require chemical restraint.
Four guards successfully placed him in mechanical restraints. During the scuffle, Mr.
They will be able to restrain us and to use mechanical restraints to do so.
The report calls for cuts in the use of strip searching by at least 50 per cent and a ban on mechanical restraints and severe restrictions on the use of physical force, which should never be used to secure compliance or as a punishment
Wright, "Mechanical Restraints, Rehabilitation Therapies and Staffing Adequacy for Risk Factors For Falls in Elderly Hospitalized Patients" (1999) 24:3 Rehabilitation Nursing 122; L.

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