measure of dispersion

measure of dispersion

A measure of the spread of a distribution out from its central value.

Examples
Interquartile range, standard deviation, variance.
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The volatility of a portfolio can be measured using standard deviation, or the measure of dispersion of a set of data points from its mean.
Assuming those electrons are spread out randomly along our line of sight, a higher measure of dispersion means more electrons and therefore a more distant source.
P1) An investor seeks to find a portfolio that is closest to a given benchmark, where the idea of "closeness" is not necessarily determined by the typical tracking error, the standard deviation, but by some other desired measure of dispersion.
The first is the absolute measure of dispersion (ADSR), which is explained (in the context of unemployment) as follows: "[absolute dispersion] measures the number of persons in all regions taken together who would have to change their labour market status in order for every region to have the same percentage unemployed as currently prevails for the [population] as a whole.
The Survey of Professional Forecasters (SPF), which is a quarterly survey of macroeconomic forecasts in the United States, provides a measure of dispersion for forecasts of each of the macroeconomic variables included in the survey.
Finally, the interaction between global integration and geographic dispersion was calculated by multiplying the global integration index by each measure of dispersion.
On Model ZSE-18, ZSE-27, and ZSE-40 high-speed extruders, Leisteritz's Macromatex TSCS controls can now track pressure build-up on the screen pack and create spreadsheet and graphic reports that provide a relative measure of dispersion quality.
To obtain a measure of dispersion, one variable, RATARE, was created by superimposing a two-dimensional grid on each board.
A measure of dispersion indicates how different the scores are from one another, how much the scores vary from one another, or the extent to which individual scores deviate from one another.
Because this measure of dispersion standardises the degree of variation with respect to the mean, it is possible also to derive an average measure of dispersion as the simple mean of the two indicators.
Due to the numerical procedures involved, the measure of dispersion produced by the Distribution-Curve Method is inaccurate under certain experimental conditions.