passionflower

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passionflower

Herbal medicine
A perennial vine that contains alkaloids (harmane, harmol and harmine), flavonoids and steroids; it is anti-inflammatory and mildly sedative, and has been used for addiction disorders, anxiety, asthma, hyperactivity in children, hypertension, insomnia, neuralgia, seizures in Parkinson’s disease, rheumatic pain, stress and whooping cough.
 
Toxicity
Passionflower should not be used while driving or operating heavy equipment, given its soporific effect; it should not be used in young children or in pregnancy (as it stimulates uterine contraction).
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to human admirers, maypop flowers attract a riot of pollinators--like a dinner bell announcing suppertime--including bees, butterflies, and various moths.
Their Forage Amaro liqueur uses maypop juice, blossoms, and leaves (along with 14 other botanicals) in their version of the traditional Italian liqueur.
Maypop leaves have long been brewed as an herbal tea for their sedative properties, and commercially produced tinctures, capsules, and teas are widely produced and available.
To eat a maypop, simply cut or break it in half and squeeze or spoon the pulp into your mouth.
I like to use this maypop liqueur in a mixed drink, combining it with a little lime, bitters, sugar, and sometimes seltzer.
Native Americans have grown maypops for centuries, and they were likely selecting for large and delectable fruits.
You can grow maypops in containers, and if you're weary of the plant getting out of control, this might be your best choice.
Picking up maypops from the ground is the simplest way to harvest fruit, and to be sure of ripeness.
In southern regions, maypops will begin to ripen by late July.
Maypops haven't received much attention from university breeding programs or commercial agriculture, but that's slowly beginning to change.
Historically, Native Americans ate maypops fresh, juiced them to make a beverage, and mixed the pulp with cornmeal.